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Behavioural Science Section / Viewpoint

Future Directions in the Study of Health Behavior among Older Adults

Ziegelmann J.P.a · Knoll N.b

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aGerman Centre of Gerontology, and bFreie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany

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Gerontology 2015;61:469-476

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Behavioural Science Section / Viewpoint

Received: May 13, 2014
Accepted: November 12, 2014
Published online: January 30, 2015
Issue release date: August 2015

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0304-324X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0003 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/GER

Abstract

The study of health behaviors and fostering health-behavior change is an important endeavor even in old age. The aim of this viewpoint article is threefold. First, we use a broad perspective for the definition of health behaviors to capture all relevant aspects of health-behavior change in older adults. Particularly, we suggest a distinction between proximal (e.g., physical activity) and distal health behaviors (e.g., social participation). Second, we recommend a stronger orientation towards processes in order to study health behaviors and the design of health-behavior change interventions. Third, we review the advantages of a developmental perspective in health psychology. Future directions in the study of health behavior among older adults are discussed.

© 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Behavioural Science Section / Viewpoint

Received: May 13, 2014
Accepted: November 12, 2014
Published online: January 30, 2015
Issue release date: August 2015

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0304-324X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0003 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/GER


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