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Frailty: Pathophysiology, Phenotype and Patient Care

83rd Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop, Barcelona, March 2014

Editor(s): Fielding R.A. (Boston, Mass.) 
Sieber C. (Erlangen-Nuremberg) 
Vellas B. (Toulouse) 
Cover

Biological Base of Frailty

Cellular Senescence and the Biology of Aging, Disease, and Frailty

LeBrasseur N.K.a, b · Tchkonia T.a · Kirkland J.L.a

Author affiliations

aRobert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging, and bDepartment of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

Related Articles for ""

Fielding RA, Sieber C, Vellas B (eds): Frailty: Pathophysiology, Phenotype and Patient Care. Nestlé Nutr Inst Workshop Ser. Nestec Ltd. Vevey/S. Karger AG Basel, © 2015, vol 83, pp 11-18

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Biological Base of Frailty

Published online: October 20, 2015
Cover Date: 2015

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-318-05477-4 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-05478-1 (Online)

Abstract

Population aging simultaneously highlights the remarkable advances in science, medicine, and public policy, and the formidable challenges facing society. Indeed, aging is the primary risk factor for many of the most common chronic diseases and frailty, which result in profound social and economic costs. Population aging also reveals an opportunity, i.e. interventions to disrupt the fundamental biology of aging could significantly delay the onset of age-related conditions as a group, and, as a result, extend the healthy life span, or health span. There is now considerable evidence that cellular senescence is an underlying mechanism of aging and age-related conditions. Cellular senescence is a process in which cells lose the ability to divide and damage neighboring cells by the factors they secrete, collectively referred to as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Herein, we discuss the concept of cellular senescence, review the evidence that implicates cellular senescence and SASP in age-related deterioration, hyperproliferation, and inflammation, and propose that this underlying mechanism of aging may play a fundamental role in the biology of frailty.

© 2015 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Biological Base of Frailty

Published online: October 20, 2015
Cover Date: 2015

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-318-05477-4 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-05478-1 (Online)


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Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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