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Original Paper

Practitioners' Perspectives on Quality of Life in Aphasia Rehabilitation in Denmark

Cruice M.a · Isaksen J.b · Randrup-Jensen L.c · Eggers Viberg M.b, c · ten Kate O.a

Author affiliations

aDivision of Language and Communication Science, School of Health Sciences, City University London, London, UK; bDepartment of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, and cDepartment of Nordic Studies and Linguistics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: January 21, 2016
Issue release date: January 2016

Number of Print Pages: 14
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1021-7762 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9972 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPL

Abstract

Objective: This study reports on Danish speech and language therapists' knowledge and understanding of quality of life (QoL) in aphasia, including therapists' views on education and training in relation to preparedness for working on QoL, use of measures, and barriers to applying QoL in practice. Methods: Fourteen Danish clinicians completed a 48-item online questionnaire regarding their views, perspectives and practices that included multiple-choice questions, rating scales, and boxes permitting free text responses. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the numerical data, and content analysis was applied to text responses. Results: The clinicians interpreted QoL as subjective well-being and participation and explored it with most clients and relatives using informal methods, primarily conversation, for the purposes of identifying relevant goals to direct treatment. Clinicians perceived a need for greater theoretical, practical, and experiential knowledge regarding QoL. They also identified a need for translated QoL instruments and training in these measures in practice. Conclusion: Despite a reported lack of knowledge about and tools for measuring QoL, Danish clinicians are applying QoL issues in their practice and perceive these issues as valuable and important in assessment and therapy. The findings have clear implications for tool development and workforce education.

© 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: January 21, 2016
Issue release date: January 2016

Number of Print Pages: 14
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1021-7762 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9972 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPL


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