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Original Paper

Reference Ranges for Neonatal Basal Ganglia Perfusion as Measured by Fractional Moving Blood Volume

Schindler T.a, b · Stevenson G.d · Jayatilake S.a · Gilbert Y.a · Oei J.L.a, b · Welsh A.a, c

Author affiliations

aFaculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, N.S.W., and Departments of bNewborn Care and cMaternal-Fetal Medicine, Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick, N.S.W., Australia; dEvelyn Perinatal Imaging Centre, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK

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Neonatology 2016;109:91-96

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: August 19, 2015
Accepted: October 02, 2015
Published online: November 20, 2015
Issue release date: February 2016

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1661-7800 (Print)
eISSN: 1661-7819 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEO

Abstract

Background: Regional changes in cerebral blood flow and perfusion are implicated in the pathogenesis of adverse neurological events that lead to death and severe disability in the newborn infant. The basal ganglia, in particular, are extremely sensitive to acute hypoxia in the perinatal period, but normal perfusion to this area is unknown. Objectives: To establish a reference range for regional basal ganglia perfusion using fractional moving blood volume (FMBV) as an index. Methods: Head ultrasounds were performed on neonates from 25 to 41 weeks' gestation. Power Doppler images were obtained from a pre-specified coronal plane. FMBV was calculated offline after selecting the basal ganglia as a region of interest. The average of five calculations was considered to be representative of the regional perfusion for each neonate. The data were analysed, and a neonatal reference range was defined. Results: 124 neonates were included in the study, and all had analysable data. The mean FMBV was 28.8% (±9.6) with a reference range defined as 10-48%. The mean FMBV for neonates <32 weeks', 32-35 weeks' and >35 weeks' gestation were 29.4% (±7.8), 29.2% (±11.0) and 27.4% (±9.7), respectively. Analysis of variance showed no significant difference between neonates based on gestation. Conclusions: We have successfully used the index FMBV to define a reference range for perfusion in the basal ganglia. These data can be used as a reference for subsequent studies that evaluate basal ganglia perfusion in pathological conditions.

© 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: August 19, 2015
Accepted: October 02, 2015
Published online: November 20, 2015
Issue release date: February 2016

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1661-7800 (Print)
eISSN: 1661-7819 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEO


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