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Original Paper

Caffeine Impact on Metabolic Syndrome Components Is Modulated by a CYP1A2 Variant

Platt D.E.i · Ghassibe-Sabbagh M.a · Salameh P.c · Salloum A.K.a · Haber M.a · Mouzaya F.a · Gauguier D.d, e · Al-Sarraj Y.f · El-Shanti H.f, g · Zalloua P.A.a, h · Abchee A.B.b

Author affiliations

aLebanese American University, School of Medicine, and bAmerican University of Beirut, School of Medicine, Beirut, and cLebanese American University, School of Pharmacy, Byblos, Lebanon; dSorbonne Universities, University Pierre and Marie Curie, University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, INSERMUMR_S 1138, Cordeliers Research Centre, and eInstitute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, University Pierre and Marie Curie, Paris, France; fQatar Biomedical Research Institute, Doha, Qatar; gUniversity of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, hHarvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass., and iBioinformatics and Pattern Discovery, IBM T.J. Watson Research Centre, Yorktown Heights, N.Y., USA

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Ann Nutr Metab 2016;68:1-11

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: August 18, 2015
Accepted: September 29, 2015
Published online: November 21, 2015
Issue release date: January 2016

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 0250-6807 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9697 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/ANM

Abstract

Cultural, dietary, and lifestyle factors are the main modulators of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) disease risk. Coffee is one of the most popular worldwide beverages, and recent epidemiological studies have showed that coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of T2DM. This study investigates the impact of coffee intake on T2DM risk and assesses the effect of CYP variants with caffeine exposures on T2DM. Data from 7,607 study subjects were analyzed by logistic regression models, among whom 3,290 GWAS data were available for CYP variants association studies using Plink analysis. These data suggest a protective relationship for women, but not for men; however, the results were not statistically significant in this dataset and there is a significant interaction in favor of women regarding heavy coffee consumption. The interaction between male gender and heavy coffee consumption becomes significant, thereby tending to cancel the protective effect of coffee for males. CYP rs2470890 allele ‘C' increases the odds of T2DM by a factor of around 1.2 but decreases the odds of caffeine boosting T2DM of 1.7 by a factor of 0.77. rs2470890 showed an association with T2DM only when the interaction with coffee was considered, thereby setting an example of genetic activation by dietary changes associating with metabolic syndrome.

© 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: August 18, 2015
Accepted: September 29, 2015
Published online: November 21, 2015
Issue release date: January 2016

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 0250-6807 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9697 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/ANM


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