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Complementary Feeding: Building the Foundations for a Healthy Life

87th Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop, Singapore, May 2016

Editor(s): Black R.E. (Baltimore, Md.) 
Makrides M. (North Adelaide, S.A.) 
Ong K.K. (Cambridge) 
Cover

Factors Influencing Healthy Growth

Modifiable Risk Factors and Interventions for Childhood Obesity Prevention within the First 1,000 Days

Dattilo A.M.

Author affiliations

Nestlé Nutrition, Vevey, Switzerland

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Black RE, Makrides M, Ong KK (eds): Complementary Feeding: Building the Foundations for a Healthy Life. Nestlé Nutr Inst Workshop Ser. Nestec Ltd. Vevey/S. Karger AG Basel, © 2017, vol 87, pp 183-196

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Factors Influencing Healthy Growth

Published online: March 17, 2017
Cover Date: 2017

Number of Print Pages: 14
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 2

ISBN: 978-3-318-05955-7 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-05956-4 (Online)

Abstract

Worldwide, the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased, amounting to 42 million overweight or obese children, and there is increasing evidence that the origins are within the first 1,000 days: the period of conception through 2 years. Antecedents of early childhood obesity are multifactorial, and associations of varying strength have been documented for genetic/epigenetic, biologic, dietary, environmental, social, and behavioral influences. Modifiable factors in pregnancy and early infancy associated with childhood obesity include maternal overweight/obesity, maternal smoking, gestational weight gain, infant and young child feeding, caregiver responsive feeding practices, as well as sleep duration, and physical activity. Promising obesity prevention interventions include those beginning during the first 1,000 days, using a multicomponent approach, with roots in nutrition education theories or behavior change communication that can continue over time. However, the limited number of completed interventions to date (within pediatric clinics or in home-based or community settings) may not be scalable to the magnitude needed for sustainable obesity prevention. Scale-up interventions that can be maintained for the durations needed, addressing infant and young child feeding and other modifiable risk factors associated with childhood obesity are needed.

© 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Factors Influencing Healthy Growth

Published online: March 17, 2017
Cover Date: 2017

Number of Print Pages: 14
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 2

ISBN: 978-3-318-05955-7 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-05956-4 (Online)


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