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Complementary Feeding: Building the Foundations for a Healthy Life

87th Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop, Singapore, May 2016

Editor(s): Black R.E. (Baltimore, Md.) 
Makrides M. (North Adelaide, S.A.) 
Ong K.K. (Cambridge) 
Cover

Factors Influencing Healthy Growth

Complementary Feeding in an Obesogenic Environment: Behavioral and Dietary Quality Outcomes and Interventions

Daniels L.A.

Author affiliations

School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Health, and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, QLD, Australia

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Black RE, Makrides M, Ong KK (eds): Complementary Feeding: Building the Foundations for a Healthy Life. Nestlé Nutr Inst Workshop Ser. Nestec Ltd. Vevey/S. Karger AG Basel, © 2017, vol 87, pp 167-181

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Factors Influencing Healthy Growth

Published online: March 17, 2017
Cover Date: 2017

Number of Print Pages: 15
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISBN: 978-3-318-05955-7 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-05956-4 (Online)

Abstract

The WHO infant feeding guidelines, including those for complementary feeding (CF), are very prescriptive, largely based on the outcomes of exclusive breastfeeding, and have a bias towards undernutrition. Consideration of longer-term outcomes related to overnutrition, the predominant nutrition problem in affluent countries, is limited. Compared to the ongoing and often zealous debates regarding the short- and long-term benefits of exclusive breastfeeding to 6 months in affluent countries, exposures (particularly feeding practices) and outcomes related to CF, independent of exclusive breastfeeding, have received little attention. In this context, consideration of a broader range of outcomes (e.g. food preferences, energy intake regulation, dietary quality, and eating behaviors) that potentially mediate the associations between infant feeding and long-term obesity and chronic disease outcomes is required. The aim of this paper is to (i) consider the impact of CF on outcomes relevant to the risk of child obesity and (ii) provide an overview of the NOURISH trial, the first large trial to evaluate an intervention that specifically targeted CF feeding practices (‘how'), including reports on long-term outcomes.

© 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel


References

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Factors Influencing Healthy Growth

Published online: March 17, 2017
Cover Date: 2017

Number of Print Pages: 15
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISBN: 978-3-318-05955-7 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-05956-4 (Online)


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