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Clinical Translational Research

Putative Tumor Suppressor Genes EGR1 and BRSK1 Are Mutated in Gastric and Colorectal Cancers

Choi E.J.a · Yoo N.J.a · Kim M.S.a · An C.H.b · Lee S.H.a

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Departments of aPathology and bGeneral Surgery, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea

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Oncology 2016;91:289-294

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Clinical Translational Research

Received: August 07, 2016
Accepted: September 05, 2016
Published online: September 28, 2016
Issue release date: November 2016

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0030-2414 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0232 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/OCL

Abstract

Objective: The transcription factor-encoding EGR1 and the kinase-encoding BRSK1 are considered putative tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). However, EGR1 and BRSK1 mutations that could inactivate their functions are not reported in colorectal (CRC) and gastric (GC) cancers. Methods: There are mononucleotide repeats in EGR1 and BRSK1, which could be mutated in cancers with defects in mismatch repair, resulting in microsatellite instability (MSI). We analyzed 124 CRCs and 79 GCs for mutations and their intratumoral heterogeneities (ITHs). Results: Twenty-one out of 79 CRCs (26.6%) and 5 out of 34 GCs (14.7%) carrying high MSI (MSI-H) exhibited frameshift mutations. However, we found no such mutations in cancers with microsatellite stability. In addition, we studied ITH for these mutations in 16 cases of CRCs and observed that EGR1 and BRSK1 mutations exhibited ITH in 3 (18.8%) and 2 (12.5%) cases, respectively. Conclusion: Our data in this study reveal that the TSG genes EGR1 and BRSK1 carry mutational ITH as well as frameshift mutations in MSI-H CRC and GC, which together may be features of GC and CRC with MSI-H. These results suggest that frameshift mutations of EGR1 and BRSK1 might play a role in tumorigenesis through TSG inactivation in CRC and GC.

© 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Clinical Translational Research

Received: August 07, 2016
Accepted: September 05, 2016
Published online: September 28, 2016
Issue release date: November 2016

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0030-2414 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0232 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/OCL


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