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Original Paper

Perspectives on Speech Timing: Coupled Oscillator Modeling of Polish and Finnish

Malisz Z.a · O'Dell M.b · Nieminen T.c · Wagner P.d

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Speech, Music and Hearing, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden; bSchool of Language, Translation and Literary Studies, University of Tampere, Tampere, and cFinnish Language and Cultural Research, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland; dFaculty of Linguistics and Literary Studies, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany

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Phonetica 2016;73:229-255

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: March 20, 2015
Accepted: September 15, 2016
Published online: February 23, 2017
Issue release date: February 2017

Number of Print Pages: 27
Number of Figures: 7
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0031-8388 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0321 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/PHO

Abstract

This stud y was ai med at analyzing empirical duration data for Polish spoken at different tempos using an updated version of the Coupled Oscillator Model of speech timing and rhythm variability (O'Dell and Nieminen, 1999, 2009). We use Bayesian inference on parameters relating to speech rate to investigate how tempo affects timing in Polish. The model parameters found are then compared with parameters obtained for equivalent material in Finnish to shed light on which of the effects represent general speech rate mechanisms and which are specific to Polish. We discuss the model and its predictions in the context of current perspectives on speech timing.

© 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: March 20, 2015
Accepted: September 15, 2016
Published online: February 23, 2017
Issue release date: February 2017

Number of Print Pages: 27
Number of Figures: 7
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0031-8388 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0321 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/PHO


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