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Original Paper

Consequences of Stimulus Type on Higher-Order Processing in Single-Sided Deaf Cochlear Implant Users

Finke M.a, b · Sandmann P.a,c,e · Bönitz H.b · Kral A.a, d · Büchner A.a, b

Author affiliations

aCluster of Excellence ‘‘Hearing4all'', and Departments of bOtorhinolaryngology and cNeurology and dInstitute of AudioNeuroTechnology and Department of Experimental Otology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, and eDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany

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Audiol Neurotol 2016;21:305-315

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: July 18, 2016
Accepted: September 20, 2016
Published online: November 19, 2016
Issue release date: January 2017

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1420-3030 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9700 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/AUD

Abstract

Single-sided deaf subjects with a cochlear implant (CI) provide the unique opportunity to compare central auditory processing of the electrical input (CI ear) and the acoustic input (normal-hearing, NH, ear) within the same individual. In these individuals, sensory processing differs between their two ears, while cognitive abilities are the same irrespectively of the sensory input. To better understand perceptual-cognitive factors modulating speech intelligibility with a CI, this electroencephalography study examined the central-auditory processing of words, the cognitive abilities, and the speech intelligibility in 10 postlingually single-sided deaf CI users. We found lower hit rates and prolonged response times for word classification during an oddball task for the CI ear when compared with the NH ear. Also, event-related potentials reflecting sensory (N1) and higher-order processing (N2/N4) were prolonged for word classification (targets versus nontargets) with the CI ear compared with the NH ear. Our results suggest that speech processing via the CI ear and the NH ear differs both at sensory (N1) and cognitive (N2/N4) processing stages, thereby affecting the behavioral performance for speech discrimination. These results provide objective evidence for cognition to be a key factor for speech perception under adverse listening conditions, such as the degraded speech signal provided from the CI.

© 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: July 18, 2016
Accepted: September 20, 2016
Published online: November 19, 2016
Issue release date: January 2017

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1420-3030 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9700 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/AUD


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