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Original Paper

Fluoride Deposition in the Aged Human Pineal Gland

Luke J.

Author affiliations

School of Biological Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK

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Caries Res 2001;35:125–128

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: March 09, 2001
Issue release date: March – April

Number of Print Pages: 4
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0008-6568 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-976X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CRE

Abstract

The purpose was to discover whether fluoride (F) accumulates in the aged human pineal gland. The aims were to determine (a) F–concentrations of the pineal gland (wet), corresponding muscle (wet) and bone (ash); (b) calcium–concentration of the pineal. Pineal, muscle and bone were dissected from 11 aged cadavers and assayed for F using the HMDS–facilitated diffusion, F–ion–specific electrode method. Pineal calcium was determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Pineal and muscle contained 297±257 and 0.5±0.4 mg F/kg wet weight, respectively; bone contained 2,037±1,095 mg F/kg ash weight. The pineal contained 16,000±11,070 mg Ca/kg wet weight. There was a positive correlation between pineal F and pineal Ca (r = 0.73, p<0.02) but no correlation between pineal F and bone F. By old age, the pineal gland has readily accumulated F and its F/Ca ratio is higher than bone.


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: March 09, 2001
Issue release date: March – April

Number of Print Pages: 4
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0008-6568 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-976X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CRE


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