Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Original Paper

Prevention by Means of Fluoride of Enamel Erosion as Caused by Soft Drinks and Orange Juice

Larsen M.J.

Author affiliations

Royal Dental College, Aarhus, Denmark

Related Articles for ""

Caries Res 2001;35:229–234

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: May 24, 2001
Issue release date: May – June

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0008-6568 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-976X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CRE

Abstract

Fluoride has been suggested to prevent erosion of the teeth, either after a topical treatment of the teeth or by addition of fluoride to the acidic drink. The main aim of the present study was to describe the dissolution of calcium fluoride in some soft drinks and orange juice and compare it with the amounts of calcium fluoride left on the enamel surfaces after a topical treatment. A further aim was to describe the dissolution of enamel in soft drinks and juice saturated for 3 days with solid calcium fluoride. Solid calcium fluoride was suspended in each of 10 soft drinks and orange juices and gently agitated for 72 h, after which the drinks were analyzed for calcium, phosphate and fluoride and pH was determined. To examine the erosion–preventive effect of the calcium fluoride–rich drink, intact teeth were exposed to the drinks with or without calcium fluoride. It was found that from 6 to 45 mg of calcium fluoride was dissolved per liter of drink. The more acidic the drink, the more calcium fluoride was dissolved, presumably due to HF formation. The teeth exposed to the soft drinks all showed erosion–like lesions. Very little effect of the 4–6 ppm ionic fluoride dissolved in the soft drinks was observed. In orange juice, however, the dissolved calcium fluoride established a saturation with respect to fluorapatite and consequently, the erosion–like lesion was replaced by a caries–like lesion. In conclusion, the acidic soft drinks are capable of dissolving considerable amounts of calcium fluoride and the erosion–preventive effect of even high fluoride concentrations is limited.


References

  1. Armitage P: Statistical Methods in Medical Research. Oxford, Blackwell, 1977.
  2. Broene HH, de Vries T: The thermodynamics of aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions. J Am Chem Soc 1947;69:1644–1646.
  3. Brudevold F: Fluoride therapy; in Bernier JL, Muhler JC (eds): Improving Dental Practice through Preventive Measures. St Louis, Mosby, 1974, pp 77–103.
  4. Bruun C, Givskov H: Formation of CaF2 on sound enamel and in caries–like enamel lesions after different forms of fluoride application in vitro. Caries Res 1991;25:96–100.
    External Resources
  5. ten Cate JM, Duijsters PPE: Influence of fluoride in solution on tooth demineralization. I. Chemical data. Caries Res 1983;17:193–199.
  6. Chen PS, Toribara TV, Warner H: Microdetermination of phosphorus. Anal Chem 1956;28:1756– 1758.
  7. Christoffersen J, Christoffersen MR, Arends J, Leonardsen ES: Formation of phosphate–containing calcium fluoride at the expense of enamel, hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite. Caries Res 1995;29:223–230.
    External Resources
  8. Davies CW, Hoyle BE: The interaction of calcium ions with some citrate buffers: A correction. J Chem Soc 1955:1038.
  9. Diem K, Lentner C (eds): Scientific Tables. Basle, Ciba–Geigy, 1975, p 501.
  10. Fejerskov O, Ekstrand J, Burt B: Fluoride in Dentistry. Copenhagen, Munksgaard, 1996.
  11. Gerould CH: Electron microscope study of the mechanism of fluorine deposition in teeth. J Dent Res 1945;24:223–233.
  12. Larsen MJ: Dissolution of enamel. Scand J Dent Res 1973;81:518–522.
    External Resources
  13. Larsen MJ: Chemically induced in vitro lesions in dental enamel. Scand J Dent Res 1974;82:496– 509.
  14. Larsen MJ: An investigation of the theoretical background for the stability of the calcium phosphate salts and their mutual conversion in aqueous solutions. Arch Oral Biol 1986;31: 757–761.
  15. Larsen MJ, Jensen SJ: On the properties of fluoride solutions used for topical treatment and mouth rinse. Caries Res 1986;20:56–64.
    External Resources
  16. Larsen MJ, Nyvad B: Enamel erosion by some soft drinks and orange juices relative to their pH, buffering effect and contents of calcium phosphate. Caries Res 1999;33:81–87.
  17. Larsen MJ, Ravnholt G: Dissolution of various calcium fluoride preparations in inorganic solutions and in stimulated human saliva. Caries Res 1994; 28:447–454.
  18. Larsen MJ, Richards A: CaF2 formation on human enamel in a salivary film. Caries Res 1998;32: 269–270.
  19. McCann HG: The solubility of fluorapatite and its relationship to that of calcium fluoride. Arch Oral Biol 1968;13:987–1001.
  20. McDowell H, Gregory TM, Brown E: Solubility of Ca5(PO4)3OH in the system Ca(OH)2–H3PO4–H2O at 5, 15, 25 and 37°C. J Res Natl Bur Stand 1977;81A:273–281.
  21. Margolis HC, Moreno EC, Murphy BJ: Effect of low levels of fluoride in solution on enamel demineralization in vitro. J Dent Res 1986;65: 23–29.
    External Resources
  22. Murray JJ, Rugg–Gunn AJ, Jenkins GN: Fluorides in Caries Prevention. Cambridge, University Press, 1991.
  23. Pearce EIF: A microradiographic and chemical comparison of in vitro systems for the simulation of incipient caries in abraded bovine enamel. J Dent Res 1983;62:969–974.
    External Resources
  24. Saxegaard E, Rølla G: Fluoride acquisition on and in human enamel during topical application in vitro. Scand J Dent Res 1988;96:523–535.
  25. Willis JB: Determination of calcium and magnesium in urine by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Anal Chem 1961;33:556–559.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: May 24, 2001
Issue release date: May – June

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0008-6568 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-976X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CRE


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.