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Commentary

Free Access

George Papanicolaou's Efforts to Develop Novel Cytologic Methods for the Early Diagnosis of Endometrial Carcinoma

Austin R.M.

Author affiliations

Department of Pathology, Magee-Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Corresponding Author

Correspondence to: Prof. R. Marshall Austin

Gynecologic Pathology Division, Department of Pathology

Magee-Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 300 Halket Street

Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (USA)

E-Mail raustin@magee.edu

Related Articles for ""

Acta Cytologica 2017;61:281-298

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Abstract

Toward the end of his career, Dr. George Papanicolaou became interested in human endometrial explants placed into tissue culture. The initial focus of his studies was on phagocytic cells emanating from endometrial explants and their role in cleansing the uterine cavity after each menstrual cycle and in sterilizing the uterine cavity in the face of infection. Papanicolaou also observed that growth rates of explanted normal and pathologic endometrial tissues differed considerably. Explants of endometrial malignancies exhibited not only increased growth rates but also visible proliferation of cells with readily identifiable cytologic features of malignancy. Acknowledging that cytologic screening for early diagnosis of intrauterine malignancies had up to that point not proven to be reliable as screening for cervical cancer, he hoped that the tissue culture explant technique could prove to be a new adjunctive diagnostic method for the diagnosis of endometrial and other female genital tract malignancies not readily detectible by other diagnostic procedures. Papanicolaou's untimely death in 1962 cut short his progress in this area of study.

© 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

  1. Papanicolaou GN, Maddi FV: Diagnostic value of cells of endometrial and ovarian origin in human tissue cultures. Acta Cytol 1961;5:1-16.
    External Resources
  2. Carmichael DE: The Pap Smear: Life of George N. Papanicolaou. Springfield, Thomas, 1973.
  3. Papanicoloau GN: Observations on the origin and specific function of the histiocytes in the female genital tract. Fertil Steril 1953;4:472-478.
    External Resources
  4. Papanicolaou GN, Maddi FV: Observations on the behavior of human endometrial cells in tissue culture. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1958;76:601-618.
    External Resources
  5. Papanicolaou GN, Maddi FV: Further observations on the behavior of human endometrial cells in tissue culture. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1959;78:156-173.
    External Resources
  6. Maddi FV, Papanicolaou GN: Diagnostic significance of ciliated cells in human endometrial tissue cultures. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1961;82:99-101.
    External Resources
  7. Papanicolaou GN, Traut HF: The diagnostic value of vaginal smears in carcinoma of the uterus. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1941;42:193-206.
    External Resources
  8. Papanicolaou GN, Traut HF: Diagnosis of Uterine Cancer By The Vaginal Smear. New York, The Commonwealth Fund, 1943.
  9. Kipp BR, Medeiros F, Campion MB, Distad MB, Peterson LM, Keeney GL, Halling KC, Clayton AC: Direct uterine sampling with the Tao brush sampler using a liquid-based preparation method for the detection of endometrial cancer and atypical hyperplasia. Cancer Cytopathol 2008;114:228-235.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Commentary

Received: April 04, 2017
Accepted: April 21, 2017
Published online: July 11, 2017
Issue release date: July – October

Number of Print Pages: 18
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0001-5547 (Print)
eISSN: 1938-2650 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/ACY

References

  1. Papanicolaou GN, Maddi FV: Diagnostic value of cells of endometrial and ovarian origin in human tissue cultures. Acta Cytol 1961;5:1-16.
    External Resources
  2. Carmichael DE: The Pap Smear: Life of George N. Papanicolaou. Springfield, Thomas, 1973.
  3. Papanicoloau GN: Observations on the origin and specific function of the histiocytes in the female genital tract. Fertil Steril 1953;4:472-478.
    External Resources
  4. Papanicolaou GN, Maddi FV: Observations on the behavior of human endometrial cells in tissue culture. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1958;76:601-618.
    External Resources
  5. Papanicolaou GN, Maddi FV: Further observations on the behavior of human endometrial cells in tissue culture. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1959;78:156-173.
    External Resources
  6. Maddi FV, Papanicolaou GN: Diagnostic significance of ciliated cells in human endometrial tissue cultures. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1961;82:99-101.
    External Resources
  7. Papanicolaou GN, Traut HF: The diagnostic value of vaginal smears in carcinoma of the uterus. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1941;42:193-206.
    External Resources
  8. Papanicolaou GN, Traut HF: Diagnosis of Uterine Cancer By The Vaginal Smear. New York, The Commonwealth Fund, 1943.
  9. Kipp BR, Medeiros F, Campion MB, Distad MB, Peterson LM, Keeney GL, Halling KC, Clayton AC: Direct uterine sampling with the Tao brush sampler using a liquid-based preparation method for the detection of endometrial cancer and atypical hyperplasia. Cancer Cytopathol 2008;114:228-235.

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