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Original Paper

Maximizing Outcome in Light Treatment: Patient Behavior as the Light Treatment Delivery System

Young M.A.

Author affiliations

Department of Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, USA

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Neuropsychobiology 2016;74:188-192

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: March 01, 2017
Accepted: April 10, 2017
Published online: June 22, 2017
Issue release date: July 2017

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0302-282X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0224 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NPS

Abstract

The effectiveness of light treatment depends on the treatment being properly received by the patient. Examination of the typical light treatment prescription shows that delivery of each component of the prescription consists of a behavior on the part of the patient. Light treatment delivery, and thus light treatment effectiveness, can be maximized by conceptualizing the treatment as a behavior change in the patient and by the application of well-established behavior change techniques.

© 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: March 01, 2017
Accepted: April 10, 2017
Published online: June 22, 2017
Issue release date: July 2017

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0302-282X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0224 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NPS


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