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Original Paper

The Nuclear Proteome of White and Gray Matter from Schizophrenia Postmortem Brains

Saia-Cereda V.M.a · Santana A.G.a · Schmitt A.b, c · Falkai P.b · Martins-de-Souza D.a, d

Author affiliations

aLaboratory of Neuroproteomics, Department of Biochemistry and Tissue Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, Brazil; bDepartment of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU), Munich, Germany; cLaboratory of Neurosciences (LIM-27), Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, and dUNICAMP's Neurobiology Center, Campinas, Brazil

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Mol Neuropsychiatry 2017;3:37-52

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: January 27, 2017
Accepted: May 03, 2017
Published online: June 17, 2017
Issue release date: August 2017

Number of Print Pages: 16
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 2296-9209 (Print)
eISSN: 2296-9179 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/MNP

Abstract

Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a serious neuropsychiatric disorder that manifests through several symptoms from early adulthood. Numerous studies over the last decades have led to significant advances in increasing our understanding of the factors involved in SCZ. For example, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis has provided important insights by uncovering protein dysfunctions inherent to SCZ. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the nuclear proteome of postmortem brain tissues from corpus callosum (CC) and anterior temporal lobe (ATL). We show an overview of the role of deregulated nuclear proteins in these two main regions of the brain: the first, mostly composed of glial cells and axons of neurons, and the second, represented mainly by neuronal cell bodies. These samples were collected from SCZ patients in an attempt to characterize the role of the nucleus in the disease process. With the ATL nucleus enrichment, we found 224 proteins present at different levels, and 76 of these were nuclear proteins. In the CC analysis, we identified 119 present at different levels, and 24 of these were nuclear proteins. The differentially expressed nuclear proteins of ATL are mainly associated with the spliceosome, whereas those of the CC region are associated with calcium/calmodulin signaling.

© 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: January 27, 2017
Accepted: May 03, 2017
Published online: June 17, 2017
Issue release date: August 2017

Number of Print Pages: 16
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 2296-9209 (Print)
eISSN: 2296-9179 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/MNP


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