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Original Paper

Sleep and Olfaction among Older Adults

McSorley V.E.a · Pinto J.b · Schumm L.P.a · Wroblewski K.a · Kern D.d · McClintock M.c · Lauderdale D.S.a

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Public Health Sciences, bPritzker School of Medicine, and cDepartment of Psychology, University of Chicago, and dNortheastern Illinois University, College of Arts and Sciences, Chicago, IL, USA

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Neuroepidemiology 2017;48:147-154

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: January 06, 2017
Accepted: June 25, 2017
Published online: July 26, 2017
Issue release date: August 2017

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0251-5350 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0208 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NED

Abstract

Background: Sleep and olfaction are both critical physiological processes that tend to worsen with age. Decline in olfaction can be an early indicator of neurodegenerative diseases, whereas poor sleep quality is associated with reduced physical and mental health. Given associations with aging-related health declines, we explored whether variations in sleep were associated with olfactory function among older adults. Methods: We assessed the relationship between sleep characteristics and olfaction among 354 community-dwelling older adults. Olfaction was measured using a validated field and survey research tool. Sleep characteristics were measured using wrist actigraphy and with self-report of sleep problems. We fit structural equation models of latent constructs of olfaction based on olfactory task items and let this be a function of each sleep characteristic. Results: Actigraph sleep quality measures were associated with odor identification, but not with odor sensitivity. Longer duration sleepers had worse odor sensitivity compared to medium (58 h) sleepers, but sleep duration was not associated with odor identification. Reported sleep problems and reported usual duration were not associated with olfaction. Conclusions: Diminished sleep quality was associated with reduced capacity to identify odors. Determining whether this is a causal association will require further study and longitudinal data.

© 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: January 06, 2017
Accepted: June 25, 2017
Published online: July 26, 2017
Issue release date: August 2017

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0251-5350 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0208 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NED


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