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Original Paper

Pleiotropic Effects of White Willow Bark and 1,2-Decanediol on Human Adult Keratinocytes

Bassino E.a · Gasparri F.b · Munaron L.a

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Turin, Turin, and bDepartment of Pharmacy (DIFARMA), University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy

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Skin Pharmacol Physiol 2018;31:10-18

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: May 12, 2017
Accepted: September 15, 2017
Published online: November 08, 2017
Issue release date: Published online first (Issue-in-Progress)

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1660-5527 (Print)
eISSN: 1660-5535 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/SPP

Abstract

Background: Acne vulgaris is a common skin defect, usually occurring during adolescence, but often it can persist in adults leaving permanent face scarring. Acne is usually treated with topical drugs, oral antibiotics, retinoids, and hormonal therapies, but medicinal plants are increasingly employed. Objective: To investigate the protective role of white willow bark (WWB) and 1,2-decanediol (DD) on the damage caused by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on human adult keratinocytes (HaCaT). Methods: HaCaT were exposed to LPS alone or in association with WWB and DD. Epidermal viability, metabolic modulation, inflammatory activity, and cell migration were assessed with both common standardized protocols or high-throughput screening systems. Results: The preincubation of HaCaT with WWB and DD (used separately or in combination) differently prevented the alterations induced by LPS on HaCaT in terms of growth factor release (IGF, EGF, VEGF), cytokine production (IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8), or expression of the transcription factor FOXO-I. Moreover, they partially restore wound repair lowered by LPS. Conclusions: These results suggest that both natural compounds were able to differently affect several functions of LPS-stressed keratinocytes suggesting their potential role for the prevention of acne vulgaris, without adverse effects.

© 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: May 12, 2017
Accepted: September 15, 2017
Published online: November 08, 2017
Issue release date: Published online first (Issue-in-Progress)

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1660-5527 (Print)
eISSN: 1660-5535 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/SPP


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