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Neurourology

Buttock Placement of the Implantable Pulse Generator: A New Implantation Technique for Sacral Neuromodulation – A Multicenter Study

Scheepens W.A.a · Weil E.H.J.a · van Koeveringe G.A.a · Rohrmann D.b · Hedlund H.E.M.c · Schurch B.d · Ostardo E.e · Pastorello M.f · Ratto C.g · Nordling J.h · van Kerrebroeck P.E.V.a

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Urology, University Hospital, Maastricht, The Netherlands; bDepartment of Urology, RWTH, Aachen, Germany; cDepartment of Urology, The National Hospital, Oslo, Norway; dSwiss Paraplegic Centre ‘Paracare’, Zürich, Switzerland; eDepartment of Urology, Ospedale S. Maria degli Angeli, Porderone, Italy; fDepartment of Urology, Negrar Hospital, Verona, Italy; gDepartment of Surgery, Catholic University Largo A. Gemelli, Rome, Italy, and hDepartment of Urology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Eur Urol 2001;40:434–438

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Neurourology

Published online: November 14, 2001
Issue release date: October 2001

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0302-2838 (Print)
eISSN: 1873-7560 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/EUR

Abstract

Objective: In the standard operation procedure for sacral neuromodulation, the implantable pulse generator (IPG) is implanted in a subcutaneous pocket at the lower part of the anterior abdominal wall. This procedure requires a long operation time and three incisions. With the IPG in the abdominal wall, some patients complain of displacement or pain at the IPG site postoperatively. By modifying the technique of placement of the IPG, these disadvantages are overcome. Methods: Between August 1999 and July 2000, 39 patients underwent a buttock implant of the IPG. In 2 of these patients the position of the IPG was changed from abdominal region to the buttock. During follow–up, complications concerning the operation and location of the IPG were compared to the published literature. Results: Operation time is reduced in all patients by approximately 1 h. No repositioning of the patient is required during surgery. Only a short subcutaneous tunnel is required to connect the lead to the IPG. Pain at the level of the IPG was noted in 10% of the patients, which needed no further treatment. No infections were seen and the IPG did not displace postoperatively. Conclusion: Buttock placement of the IPG in sacral nerve stimulation leads to shorter operation time; only two incisions are needed instead of three and a shorter subcutaneous tunnel is needed. Using this technique there are less complications and a lower re–operation rate.


References

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Neurourology

Published online: November 14, 2001
Issue release date: October 2001

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0302-2838 (Print)
eISSN: 1873-7560 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/EUR


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