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Technical Report

Field Kit to Characterize Physical, Chemical and Spatial Aspects of Potential Primate Foods

Lucas P.W.a · Beta T.e · Darvell B.W.c · Dominy N.J.a · Essackjee H.C.a · Lee P.K.D.c · Osorio D.d · Ramsden L.b · Yamashita N.a · Yuen T.D.B.c

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Anatomy, bDepartment of Botany and cUnit of Dental Materials Science, University of Hong Kong, PR China; dSchool of Biological Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK; eDepartment of Food Science, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe

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Folia Primatol 2001;72:11–25

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Technical Report

Published online: March 16, 2001
Issue release date: January – February

Number of Print Pages: 15
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR

Abstract

An outline is given for a field kit aiming to substantially increase the in situ knowledge gleaned from feeding studies of primates. Measurements are made of colouration (spectrum of non-specular reflection) and many mechanical, chemical and spatial properties of primate foods.

© 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel


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    External Resources

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Technical Report

Published online: March 16, 2001
Issue release date: January – February

Number of Print Pages: 15
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR


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