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Research Report

Multiple Access to Sterile Syringes for Injection Drug Users: Vending Machines, Needle Exchange Programs and Legal Pharmacy Sales in Marseille, France

Moatti J.P.a,b · Vlahov D.c,d · Feroni I.a,e · Perrin V.a,f · Obadia Y.a,f

Author affiliations

aINSERM Research Unit 379, ‘Social Sciences Applied to Medical Innovation’, Institut Paoli Calmettes, bDepartment of Economics, University of Aix-Marseille II, Marseille, France; cJohns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md., dCenter for Urban Epidemiologic Studies, New York Academy of Medicine, New York, N.Y., USA; eDepartment of Sociology, University of Nice, Nice, fRegional Center for Disease Control of Southeastern France (ORS-PACA), Marseille, France

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Eur Addict Res 2001;7:40–45

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Research Report

Published online: April 09, 2001
Issue release date: March 2001

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1022-6877 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9891 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/EAR

Abstract

Objective: In Marseille, southeastern France, HIV prevention programs for injection drug users (IDUs) simultaneously include access to sterile syringes through needle exchange programs (NEPs), legal pharmacy sales and, since 1996, vending machines that mechanically exchange new syringes for used ones. The purpose of this study was to compare the characteristics of IDUs according to the site where they last obtained new syringes. Methods: During 3 days in September 1997, all IDUs who obtained syringes from 32 pharmacies, four NEPs and three vending machines were offered the opportunity to complete a self-administered questionnaire on demographics, drug use characteristics and program utilization. Results: Of 485 individuals approached, the number who completed the questionnaire was 141 in pharmacies, 114 in NEPs and 88 at vending machines (response rate = 70.7%). Compared to NEP users, vending machine users were younger and less likely to be enrolled in a methadone program or to report being HIV infected, but more likely to misuse buprenorphine. They also had lower financial resources and were less likely to be heroin injectors than both pharmacy and NEP users. Conclusions: Our results suggest that vending machines attract a very different group of IDUs than NEPs, and that both programs are useful adjuncts to legal pharmacy sales for covering the needs of IDUs for sterile syringes in a single city. Assessment of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of combining such programs for the prevention of HIV and other infectious diseases among IDUs requires further comparative research.

© 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel


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    External Resources

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Research Report

Published online: April 09, 2001
Issue release date: March 2001

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1022-6877 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9891 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/EAR


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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