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Stones

Course of Calcium Stone Disease without Treatment. What Can We Expect?

Strohmaier W.L.

Author affiliations

Department of Urology, Klinikum Coburg, Germany

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Eur Urol 2000;37:339–344

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Stones

Published online: March 01, 2000
Issue release date: March 2000

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 6

ISSN: 0302-2838 (Print)
eISSN: 1873-7560 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/EUR

Abstract

Objectives: The knowledge of the natural history (i.e. the course of the disease without metaphylaxis is the base for establishing rational guidelines for metaphylaxis in urolithiasis. Methods: This review is based on a Medline™ Search (1966–1999) and the proceedings of the Bonn–Vienna and European symposia on urolithiasis. Only 31 references were sufficient for the purpose of this review. Results: In idiopathic calcium stone disease, stone frequency without metaphylaxis is 0.10–0.15 stones per patient per year. The average recurrence rate is 30–40%. Recurrence rate increases with age and observation time. Risk for recurrence is highest during the first 4 years after the first stone episode. More than 50% of all recurrent stone formers have only one recurrence during their lives. 10% of recurrent stone formers have more than 3 recurrences. Risk factors for recurrence are: male sex, multiple and lower calyx stones, early onset, familial history, complications after stone removal. Metabolic evaluation is a poor predictor of the risk for recurrence. Conclusions: Renunciation of metaphylaxis is justified in first stone formers with idiopathic calcium oxalate and apatite stones. All patients, however, should be advised to increase their fluid intake.


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Stones

Published online: March 01, 2000
Issue release date: March 2000

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 6

ISSN: 0302-2838 (Print)
eISSN: 1873-7560 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/EUR


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