Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Review

Cupressaceae Pollinosis: Identification, Purification and Cloning of Relevant Allergens

Di Felice G. · Barletta B. · Tinghino R. · Pini C.

Author affiliations

Department of Immunology, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy

Related Articles for ""

Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2001;125:280–289

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review

Published online: September 13, 2001
Issue release date: August 2001

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA

Abstract

Allergy to Cupressaceae pollen is a worldwide pollinosis caused by several species. Pollen extracts prepared from allergenic species belonging to this family are characterised by low protein and high carbohydrate content. The allergenic components represented in the pollen extracts from different species of the Cupressaceae family show high levels of cross-reactivity when probed with human IgE from allergic subjects and share a number of common epitopes also identified by polyclonal rabbit antisera and monoclonal antibodies. A close relationship has also been described with the Taxodiaceae and Podocarpaceae families. Although both proteic and carbohydrate epitopes appear to be involved in IgE recognition and allergenic cross-reactivity, a large portion of the IgE reactivity of Cupressaceae-allergic patients seems to be associated with sugar moieties present on the relevant allergenic molecules. From this point of view, Cupressaceae/Taxodiaceae allergens constitute a particularly useful model to study IgE cross-reactivity, as they have been shown to display different levels of homology. Moreover, the availability of the purified allergens, together with their recombinant counterparts, may shed light on the actual role played by carbohydrate in allergic sensitisation, IgE recognition and allergenic cross-reactivity.

© 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

  1. Yoo TY, Spitz E, McGerity JL: Conifer pollen allergy: Studies of immunogenicity and cross antigenicity of conifer pollens in rabbit and man. Ann Allergy 1975;34:93–97.
  2. Ramirez DA: The natural history of mountain cedar pollinosis. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1984;73:88–93.
  3. Ordman D: Cypress pollinosis in South Africa. Study of seasonal hayfever and allergic conjunctivitis occurring in winter-spring period. S Afr Med J 1970;19:739–751.
  4. Bass D, Baldo BA, Pham NH: White cypress pine pollen: An important seasonal allergen source in rural Australia. Med J Aust 1991;155:572.
  5. D’Amato G, Spieksma FT, Liccardi G, Jager S, Russo M, Kontou-Fili K, Nikkels H, Wuthrich B, Bonini S: Pollen-related allergy in Europe. Allergy 1998;53:567–578.
  6. Panzani R, Centanni G, Brunel M: Increase of respiratory allergy to the pollens of cypresses in the south of France. Ann Allergy 1986;56:460–463.
  7. Caiaffa MF, Macchia L, Strada S, Bariletto G, Scarpelli F, Tursi A: Airborne Cupressaceae pollen in southern Italy. Ann Allergy 1993;71:45–50.
  8. Iacovacci P, Afferni C, Barletta B, Tinghino R, Di Felice G, Pini C, Mari A: Juniperus oxycedrus: A new allergenic pollen from the Cupressaceae family. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1998;101:755–761.
  9. Guerra F, Daza JC, Miguel R, Moreno C, Galan C, Dominguez E, Sanchez Guijo P: Sensitivity to Cupressus: Allergenic significance in Cordoba (Spain). J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 1996;6:117–120.
  10. Tas J: Hay fever due to the pollen of Cupressus sempervirens, Italian or Mediterranean cypress. Acta Allergol 1965;20:405–407.
    External Resources
  11. Yasueda H, Yui Y, Shimizu T, Shida T: Isolation and partial characterization of the major allergen from Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1983;1:77–86.
  12. Midoro-Horiuti T: Evaluation of allergenicity of the extract of Japanese juniper pollen reacting to sera from asthmatic children – by the methods of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting (in Japanese). Arerugi 1992;41:1459–1465.
  13. Midoro-Horiuti T, Nouno S, Seino Y: Skin tests of pollen grains of Taxodiaceae and Cupressaceae in children with bronchial asthma. Acta Paediatr Jpn 1992;34:501–504.
  14. Ito H, Nishimura J, Suzuki M, Mamiya S, Sato K, Takagi I, Baba S: Specific IgE to Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) in patients with nasal allergy. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 1995;74:299–303.
  15. Mari A, Di Felice G, Afferni C, Barletta B, Tinghino R, Sallusto F, Pini C: Assessment of skin prick test and serum specific IgE detection in the diagnosis of Cupressaceae pollinosis. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1996;98:21–31.
  16. Panzani RC, Ariano R: Allergenic significance of Cupressaceae and Taxodiaceae pollen in some parts of the Mediterranean and all over the world. Indian J Aerobiol 1999;12:1–10.
  17. Papa G, Romano A, Quaratino D, Di Fonso M, Viola M, Artesani MC, Sernia S, Di Gioacchino M, Venuti A: Prevalence of sensitization to Cupressus sempervirens: A 4-year retrospective study. Sci Total Environ 2001;270:83–87.
    External Resources
  18. Di Felice G, Caiaffa MF, Bariletto G, Afferni C, Di Paola R, Mari A, Palumbo S, Tinghino R, Sallusto F, Tursi A, Macchia L, Pini C: Allergens of Arizona cypress (Cupressus arizonica) pollen: Characterization of the pollen extract and identification of the allergenic components. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1994;94:547–555.
  19. Mari A, Di Felice G, Afferni C, Barletta B, Tinghino R, Pini C: Cypress allergy: An underestimated pollinosis. Allergy 1997;52:355–356.
  20. Miyamoto T: Epidemiology of pollution-induced airway disease in Japan. Allergy 1997;52(suppl 38):30–36.
  21. Schwietz LA, Goetz DW, Whisman BA, Reid MJ: Cross-reactivity among conifer pollens. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2000;84:87–93.
    External Resources
  22. Bucholtz GA, Lockey RF, Serbousek D: Bald cypress tree (Taxodium distichum) pollen, an allergen. Ann Allergy 1985;55:805–810.
    External Resources
  23. Panzani R, Yasueda H, Shimizu T, Shida T: Cross-reactivity between the pollens of Cupressus sempervirens (common cypress) and of Cryptomeria japonica (Japanese cedar). Ann Allergy 1986;57:26–30.
  24. Bar Dayan Y, Keynan N, Waisel Y, Pick AI, Tamir R: Podocarpus gracilior and Calitris verrucosa – newly identified allergens that crossreact with Cupressus sempervirens. Clin Exp Allergy 1995;25:456–460.
  25. Guerin B, Kanny G, Terrasse G, Guyot JL, Moneret-Vautrin DA: Allergic rhinitis to Thuja pollen. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 1996;110:91–94.
    External Resources
  26. Bousquet J, Knani J, Hejjaoui A, Ferrando R, Cour P, Dhivert H, Michel FB: Heterogeneity of atopy. I. Clinical and immunologic characteristics of patients allergic to cypress pollen. Allergy 1993;48:183–188.
  27. Dhivert-Donnadieu H: Allergy to cypress: Clinical aspects (in French). Allerg Immunol (Paris) 2000;32:133–135.
    External Resources
  28. Ariano R, Panzani RC, Saraga J: New clinical data and therapeutic prospects in Cupressaceae pollen allergy. Allerg Immunol (Paris) 2000;32:135–138.
    External Resources
  29. Ramirez DA: The natural history of mountain cedar pollinosis. Allerg Immunol (Paris) 2000;32:86–90.
  30. Ford SA, Baldo BA, Panzani R, Bass D: Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) pollen allergens: Identification by protein blotting and improved detection of specific IgE antibodies. Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 1991;95:178–183.
  31. Pham NH, Baldo BA, Bass DJ: Cypress pollen allergy. Identification of allergens and crossreactivity between divergent species. Clin Exp Allergy 1994;24:558–565.
  32. Gross GN, Zimburean JM, Capra JD: Isolation and partial characterization of the allergen in mountain cedar pollen. Scand J Immunol 1978;8:437–441.
    External Resources
  33. Taniai M, Ando S, Usui M, Kurimoto M, Sakaguchi M, Inouye S, Matuhasi S: N-terminal amino acid sequence of a major allergen of Japanese cedar pollen (Cry j I). FEBS Lett 1988;239:329–332.
  34. Taniguchi Y, Ono A, Sawatani M, Namba M, Kohno K, Usui M, Kurimoto M, Matuhasi T: Cry j I, a major allergen of Japanese cedar pollen, has pectate lyase enzyme activity. Allergy 1995;50:90–93.
  35. Takahashi Y, Mizoguchi J, Katagiri S: Development and distribution of the major pollen allergen (Cry j I) in male flower buds of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica). Arerugi 1989;38:1354–1358.
    External Resources
  36. Rafnar T, Griffith IJ, Kuo MC, Bond JF, Rogers BL, Klapper DG: Cloning of Amb a 1 (antigen E), the major allergen family of short ragweed pollen. J Biol Chem 1991;226:1229–1236.
  37. Rogers BL, Morgenstern JP, Griffith IJ, Yu XB, Counsell CM, Brauer AW, King TP, Garman RD, Kuo MC: Complete sequence of the allergen Amb a 2:Recombinant expression and reactivity with T cells from ragweed-allergic patients. J Immunol 1991;147:2547–2552.
  38. Cohen FE: The parallel β helix of pectate lyase C: Something to sneeze at. Science 1993;260:1444–1445.
    External Resources
  39. Sakaguchi M, Inouye S, Taniai M, Ando S, Usui M, Matuhasi T: Identification of the second major allergen of Japanese cedar pollen. Allergy 1990;45:309–312.
  40. Kawashima T, Taniai M, Taniguchi Y, Usui M, Ando S, Kurimoto M, Matuhasi T: Antigenic analyses of Sugi basic protein by monoclonal antibodies. I. Distribution and characterization of B-cell-tropic epitopes of Cry j I molecules. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 1992;98:110–117.
    External Resources
  41. Kawashima T, Taniai M, Usui M, Ando S, Kurimoto M, Matuhasi T: Antigenic analyses of Sugi basic protein by monoclonal antibodies. II. Detection of immunoreactive fragments in enzyme-cleaved Cry j I. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 1992;98:118–126.
    External Resources
  42. Ohtsuki T, Taniguchi Y, Kohno K, Fukuda S, Usui M, Kurimoto M: Cry j 2, a major allergen of Japanese cedar pollen, shows polymethylgalacturonase activity. Allergy 1995;50:483–488.
  43. Taniai M, Kayano T, Takakura R, Yamamoto S, Usui M, Ando S, Kurimoto M, Panzani R, Matuhasi T: Epitopes on Cry j I and Cry j II for the human IgE antibodies cross-reactive between Cupressus sempervirens and Cryptomeria japonica pollen. Mol Immunol 1993;30:183–189.
  44. Ogawa H, Hijikata A, Amano M, Kojima K, Fukushima H, Ishizuka I, Kurihara Y, Matsumoto I: Structures and contribution to antigenicity of oligosaccharides of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen allergen Cry j I: Relationship between the structures and antigenic epitopes of plants N-linked complex-type glycans. Glycoconj J 1996;13:555–566.
  45. Hijikata A, Matsumoto I, Kojima K, Ogawa H: Antigenicity of the oligosaccharide moiety of the Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen allergen Cry j I. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 1994;105:198–202.
  46. Suzuki M, Ito H, Sugiyama K, Takagi I, Nishimura J, Kato K, Mamiya S, Baba S, Ohya Y, Itoh H, et al: Causative allergens of allergic rhinitis in Japan with special reference to silkworm moth allergen. Allergy 1995;50:23–27.
  47. Suzuki M, Komiyama N, Itoh H, Sone T, Kino K, Takagi I, Ohta N: Purification, characterization and molecular cloning of Cha o 1, a major allergen of Chamaecyparis obtusa (Japanese cypress) pollen. Mol Immunol 1996;33:451–460.
    External Resources
  48. Mori T, Yokoyama M, Komiyama N, Okano M, Kino K: Purification, identification, and cDNA cloning of Cha o 2, the second major allergen of Japanese cypress pollen. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1999;263:166–171.
    External Resources
  49. Yasueda H, Saito A, Sakaguchi M, Ide T, Saito S, Taniguchi Y, Akiyama K, Inouye S: Identification and characterization of a group 2 conifer pollen allergen from Chamaecyparis obtusa, a homologue of Cry j 2 from Cryptomeria japonica. Clin Exp Allergy 2000;30:546–550.
  50. Midoro-Horiuti T, Goldblum RM, Kurosky A, Goetz DW, Brooks EG: Isolation and characterization of the mountain cedar (Juniperus ashei) pollen major allergen, Jun a 1. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1999;104:608–612.
  51. Midoro-Horiuti T, Goldblum RM, Kurosky A, Wood TG, Brooks EG: Variable expression of pathogenesis-related protein allergen in mountain cedar (Juniperus ashei) pollen. J Immunol 2000;164:2188–2192.
    External Resources
  52. Yokoyama M, Miyahara M, Shimizu K, Kino K, Tsunoo H: Purification, identification and cDNA cloning of Jun a 2, the second major allergen of mountain cedar pollen. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2000;275:195–202.
  53. Alisi C, Afferni C, Iacovacci P, Barletta B, Tinghino R, Butteroni C, Puggioni EMR, Wilson IBH, Federico R, Schininà ME, Ariano R, Di Felice G, Pini C: Rapid isolation, characterization and glycan analysis of Cup a 1, the major allergen from Arizona cypress (Cupressus arizonica) pollen. Allergy, in press.
  54. Valenta R, Vrtala S, Laffer S, Spitzauer S, Kraft D: Recombinant allergens. Allergy 1998;53:552–561.
  55. van Ree R, van Leeuwen A, Bond J, Aalberse R: Perspective of purified natural and recombinant allergens in diagnosis and treatment of inhalant allergies. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 1999;118:212–213.
  56. Valenta R, Twardosz A, Vrtala S, Kraft D: Large scale production and quality criteria of recombinant allergens; in Kurth R, Haustein D (eds): Regulatory Control and Standardization of Allergenic Extracts. Darmstadt, Git, 2000, pp 211–225.
  57. Sone T, Komiyama N, Shimizu K, Kusakabe T, Morikubo K, Kino K: Cloning and sequencing of cDNA coding for Cry j I, a major allergen of Japanese cedar pollen. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1994;199:619–625.
  58. Midoro-Horiuti T, Goldblum RM, Kurosky A, Wood TG, Schein CH, Brooks EG: Molecular cloning of the mountain cedar (Juniperus ashei) pollen major allergen, Jun a 1. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1999;104:613–617.
  59. Midoro-Horiuti T, Goldblum RM, Brooks EG: Identification of mutations in the genes for the pollen allergens of eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana). Clin Exp Allergy 2001;31:771–778.
    External Resources
  60. Aceituno E, Del Pozo V, Minguez A, Arrieta I, Cortegano I, Cardaba B, Gallardo S, Rojo M, Palomino P, Lahoz C: Molecular cloning of major allergen from Cupressus arizonica pollen: Cup a 1. Clin Exp Allergy 2000;30:1750–1758.
    External Resources
  61. Namba M, Kurose M, Torigoe K, Hino K, Taniguchi Y, Fukuda S, Usui M, Kurimoto M: Molecular cloning of the second major allergen, Cry j II, from Japanese cedar pollen. FEBS Lett 1994;353:124–128.
  62. Komiyama N, Sone T, Shimizu K, Morikubo K, Kino K: cDNA cloning and expression of Cry j II, the second major allergen of Japanese cedar pollen. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1994;201:1021–1028.
  63. Tinghino R, Barletta B, Palumbo S, Afferni C, Iacovacci P, Mari A, Di Felice G, Pini C: Molecular characterization of a cross-reactive Juniperus oxycedrus pollen allergen, Jun o 2: A novel calcium-binding allergen. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1998;101:772–777.
  64. Valenta R, Hayek B, Seiberler S, Bugajska-Schretter A, Niederberger V, Twardosz A, Natter S, Vangelista L, Pastore A, Spitzauer S, Kraft D: Calcium-binding allergens: From plants to man. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 1998;117:160–166.
  65. Barletta B, Afferni C, Tinghino R, Mari A, Di Felice G, Pini C: Cross-reactivity between Cupressus arizonica and Cupressus sempervirens pollen extracts. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1996;98:797–804.
    External Resources
  66. Andre C, Dumur JP, Hrabina M, Lefebvre E, Sicard H: Juniperus ashei: The gold standard of the Cupressaceae (in French). Allerg Immunol (Paris) 2000;32:104–106.
  67. Ohno N, Ide T, Sakaguchi M, Inouye S, Saito S: Common antigenicity between Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) pollen. II. Determination of the cross-reacting T-cell epitope of cry j 1 and cha o 1 in mice. Immunology 2000;99:630–634.
    External Resources
  68. Kingetsu I, Ohno N, Hayashi N, Sakaguchi M, Inouye S, Saito S: Common antigenicity between Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen and Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) pollen. I. H-2 complex affects cross responsiveness to Cry j 1 and Cha o 1 at the T- and B-cell level in mice. Immunology 2000;99:625–629.
    External Resources
  69. Nakamura Y, Takagi S, Suzuki M, Ito H, Murakami S, Ohta N: Survival of memory T cells specific for Japanese cypress pollen allergen is maintained by cross-stimulation of putative pectate lyases from other plants. Allergy 2001;56:385–392.
    External Resources
  70. Pham NH, Baldo BA: Allergenic relationship between taxonomically diverse pollens. Clin Exp Allergy 1995;25:599–606.
  71. van Ree R, Cabanes-Macheteau M, Akkerdaas J, Milazzo J-P, Loutelier-Bourhis C, Rayon C, Villaba M, Koppelman S, Aalberse R, Rodriguez R, Faye L, Lerouge P: β(1,2)-Xylose and α(1,3)-fucose residues have a strong contribution in IgE binding to plant glycoallergens. J Biol Chem 2000;275:11451–11458.
  72. Aalberse RC, Akkerdaas JH, van Ree R: Cross-reactivity of IgE antibodies. Allergy 2001;56:478–490.
    External Resources
  73. Sward-Nordmo M, Smestad PB, Wold JK, Grimmer O: Characterization of the carbohydrate moiety in a partly purified allergen preparation from the mould Cladosporium herbarum and its possible importance for allergenic activity as tested by RAST-inhibition. Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 1984;75:149–156.
    External Resources
  74. Tretter V, Altmann F, Kubelka V, Marz L, Beeker WM: Fucose α 1,3-linked to the core region of glycoprotein N-glycans creates an important epitope for IgE from honeybee venom allergic individuals. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 1993;102:259–266.
  75. Johnsen TK, Smestad Paulsen B, Wold JK: Isolation and partial characterization of the glycoprotein Fel d 1, the major allergen in cat dander. Am Lab 1997;29:22–27.
  76. Afferni C, Iacovacci P, Barletta B, Di Felice G, Tinghino R, Mari A, Pini C: Role of carbohydrate moieties in IgE binding to allergenic components of Cupressus arizonica pollen extract. Clin Exp Allergy 1999;29:1087–1094.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review

Published online: September 13, 2001
Issue release date: August 2001

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.