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Gene Mapping, Cloning and Sequencing

Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel peptidylprolyl isomerase (cyclophilin)-like gene (PPIL3) from human fetal brain

Zhou Z. · Ying K. · Dai J. · Tang R. · Wang W. · Huang Y. · Zhao W. · Xie Y. · Mao Y.

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State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (People’s Republic of China)

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Cytogenet Cell Genet 92:231–236 (2001)

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Gene Mapping, Cloning and Sequencing

Published online: June 28, 2001
Issue release date: 2001

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

During the large-scale sequencing analysis of a human fetal brain cDNA library, we isolated two cDNA clones encoding two novel proteins, which show 52% and 72% identity to the cyclophilin isoform 10 of C. elegans, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed these two cDNA clones are two different splicing variants of a novel cyclophilin-like gene (PPIL3). The PPIL3 gene was identified on a completely sequenced BAC (GenBank accession AC005037) from chromosome 2q33 between STS markers stSG2762 (proximal) and SHGC-3074 (distal), oriented toward the telomere. The PPIL3 gene consisted of eight exons spanning more than 18 kb of genomic DNA. RT-PCR analysis indicated that PPIL3 was ubiquitously expressed in adult human tissues.   

© 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Gene Mapping, Cloning and Sequencing

Published online: June 28, 2001
Issue release date: 2001

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR


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