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Hypothalamic and Pituitary Actions of Gonadal Steroids

Direct Actions of Estradiol on the Anterior Pituitary Gland Are Required for Hypothalamus-Dependent Lactotrope Proliferation and Secretory Surges of Luteinizing Hormone but Not of Prolactin in Female Rats

Yin P. · Kawashima K. · Arita J.

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Department of Physiology, Yamanashi Medical University, Yamanashi, Japan

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Neuroendocrinology 2002;75:392–401

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Hypothalamic and Pituitary Actions of Gonadal Steroids

Published online: June 07, 2002
Issue release date: June 2002

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEN

Abstract

Estradiol induces surges of prolactin (PRL) and luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion as well as lactotrope proliferation in female rats. We examined whether these hypothalamus-dependent events require the direct action of estradiol on the anterior pituitary gland by selective blockade of its peripheral actions, using ICI182,780 (ICI), an antiestrogen that cannot cross the blood-brain barrier. Injection of ICI into ovariectomized rats, at a dose of 250 µg/day for 4 days, almost completely inhibited estradiol-induced growth of the uterus, proliferation of lactotropes as determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, and afternoon surges of LH secretion. However, ICI only partially inhibited estradiol-induced surges of PRL secretion and had no effect on estradiol-induced tonic inhibition of LH secretion even at the highest dose of 1,000 µg/day. The inhibitory effects of ICI found at 250 µg/day were attributable to its selective peripheral, but not central actions since ICI did not alter hypothalamic expression of progesterone receptors, an estradiol-dependent brain process. Estradiol-induced increases in the number of progesterone receptor-immunoreactive cells in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus and the medial preoptic area were not inhibited by this dose of ICI but were inhibited by 500 µg/day tamoxifen, an antiestrogen that can cross the blood-brain barrier. Treatment of cycling female rats with 250 µg/day ICI beginning from diestrus day 2 was also effective in blocking estrous lactotrope proliferation and preovulatory surges of LH secretion but not PRL secretion. Finally, in ovariectomized estradiol-treated pup-deprived lactating rats, ICI did not affect suckling-induced PRL secretion but completely blocked lactotrope proliferation. These results suggest that a direct estradiol action on the anterior pituitary gland is required for lactotrope proliferation and the positive feedback action on LH secretion but not for the secretory surges of PRL or for negative feedback.

© 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Hypothalamic and Pituitary Actions of Gonadal Steroids

Published online: June 07, 2002
Issue release date: June 2002

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEN


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