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Quantification of Corticosteroid-Induced Skin Vasoconstriction: Visual Ranking, Chromameter Measurement or Digital Imaging Analysis

Smith E.W.a · Haigh J.M.b · Surber C.c

Author affiliations

aCollege of Pharmacy, Ohio Northern University Ada, Ohio, USA; bFaculty of Pharmacy, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa, and cInstitute of Hospital Pharmacy, Department of Dermatology and Department of Pharmacy, University of Basel, Switzerland

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Dermatology 2002;205:3–10

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Comments

Received: December 28, 2001
Accepted: January 03, 2002
Published online: July 24, 2002
Issue release date: 2002

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1018-8665 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9832 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DRM

Abstract

Topical corticosteroid formulations have been evaluated by visual grading protocols for many years. Toward a more objective methodology, several instrumental methods have been evaluated for applicability in quantifying the vasoconstriction side-effect that follows corticosteroid application to the skin. Although the chromameter has been adopted by regulatory bodies throughout the world as the current standard for topical bioequivalence determinations, there is considerable criticism of this instrument from several quarters. A preliminary comparison reported here indicates that digital image analysis provides statistically significant results that are similar to those obtained by visual assessment techniques, and shows considerably greater precision than that obtained by the chromameter. Continued evaluation of objective assessment techniques, such as digital imaging, and continued modernisation of regulatory bioequivalence requirements will assist in protecting patients and optimising clinical results.

© 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

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    External Resources
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    External Resources
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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Comments

Received: December 28, 2001
Accepted: January 03, 2002
Published online: July 24, 2002
Issue release date: 2002

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1018-8665 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9832 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DRM


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Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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