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Original Paper

Ecocultural Understanding of Children's Developmental Pathways

Weisner T.S.1

Author affiliations

University of California, Los Angeles, Calif., USA

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Human Development 2002;45:275–281

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: July 18, 2002
Issue release date: July – August

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0018-716X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0054 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HDE

Abstract

Every cultural community provides developmental pathways for children within some ecological-cultural (ecocultural) context. Cultural pathways are made up of everyday routines of life, and routines are made up of cultural activities children engage. Activities (bedtime, playing video games, homework, watching TV, cooking dinner, soccer practice, visiting grandma, babysitting for money, algebra class) are useful units for cultural analysis because they are meaningful units for parents and children, and they are amenable to ethnographic fieldwork, systemic observation, and interviewing. Activities crystallize culture directly in everyday experience, because they include values and goals, resources needed to make the activity happen, people in relationships, the tasks the activity is there to accomplish, emotions and motives of those engaged in the activity, and a script defining the appropriate, normative way to engage in that activity. The Ecocultural Family Interview provides a window into children''s and families'' daily routines and activities.


References

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: July 18, 2002
Issue release date: July – August

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0018-716X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0054 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HDE


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