Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Iron: Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration

Protein Oxidation and Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction in Porcine White Matter following Intracerebral Infusions of Whole Blood or Plasma

Wagner K.R.a,c,d · Packard B.A.c · Hall C.L.a · Smulian A.G.d · Linke M.J.d · de Courten-Myers G.M.b · Packard L.M.a · Hall N.C.a

Author affiliations

Departments of aNeurology and bPathology and Laboratory Medicine, and cNeuroscience Graduate Program, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and dMedical Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

Related Articles for ""

Dev Neurosci 2002;24:154–160

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information










I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information










I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 9.00 *
EUR 8.00 *
USD 9.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Iron: Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration

Received: May 01, 2002
Accepted: June 25, 2002
Published online: October 28, 2002
Issue release date: October 2002

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0378-5866 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9859 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DNE

Abstract

Spontaneous or traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the white matter of neonates, children and adults causes significant mortality and morbidity. The detailed biochemical mechanisms through which blood damages white matter are poorly defined. Presently, we tested the hypothesis that ICH induces rapid oxidative stress in white matter. Also, since clot-derived plasma proteins accumulate in white matter after ICH and these proteins can induce oxidative stress in microglia in vitro, we determined whether the blood’s plasma component alone induces oxidative stress. Lastly, since heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction is highly sensitive to oxidative stress, we also examined white matter HO-1 gene expression. We infused either whole blood or plasma (2.5 ml) into the frontal hemispheric white matter of pentobarbital-anesthetized pigs (∼1 kg) over 15 min. We monitored and controlled physiologic variables and froze brains in situ between 1 and 24 h after ICH. White matter oxidative stress was determined by measuring protein carbonyl formation and HO-1 gene expression by RT-PCR. Protein carbonyl formation occurred rapidly in the white matter adjacent to both blood and plasma clots with significant elevations (3- to 4-fold) already 1 h after infusion. This increase remained through the first 24 h. HO-1 mRNA was rapidly induced in white matter with either whole blood or plasma infusions. These results demonstrate that not only whole blood but also its plasma component are capable of rapidly inducing oxidative stress in white matter. This rapid response, possibly in microglial cells, may contribute to white matter damage not only following ICH, but also in pathophysiological states in which blood-brain-barrier permeability to plasma proteins is increased.

© 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

  1. Perlman JM: White matter injury in the preterm infant: An important determination of abnormal neurodevelopment outcome. Early Hum Dev 1998;53:99–120.
  2. Foulkes MA, Wolf PA, Price TR, Mohr JP, Hier DB: The Stroke Data Bank: Design, methods, and baseline characteristics. Stroke 1988;19:547–554.
  3. Ribas G, Jane H: Traumatic contusions and intracerebral hematomas. J Neurotrauma 1992;9(suppl 1):S265–S278.
  4. Gebel JM, Sila CA, Sloan MA, Granger CB, Mahaffey KW, Weisenberger J, Green CL, White HD, Gore JM, Weaver WD, Califf RM, Topol EJ: Thrombolysis-related intracranial hemorrhage: A radiographic analysis of 244 cases from the GUSTO-1 trial with clinical correlation. Stroke 1998;29:563–569.
  5. Turner CP, Panter SS, Sharp FR: Anti-oxidants prevent focal rat brain injury as assessed by induction of heat shock proteins (HSP70, HO-1/HSP32, HSP47) following subarachnoid injections of lysed blood. Brain Res Mol Brain Res 1999;65:87–102.
  6. Lewen A, Matz PG, Chan PH: Free radical pathways in CNS injury. J Neurotrauma 2000;17:871–890.
  7. Peeling J, Yan HJ, Chen SG, Campbell M, Del Bigio MR: Protective effects of free radical inhibitors in intracerebral hemorrhage in rat. Brain Res 1998;795:63–70.
  8. Asahi M, Asahi K, Wang GX, Lo EH: Reduction of tissue plasminogen activator-induced hemorrhage and brain injury by free radical spin trapping after embolic focal cerebral ischemia in rats. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 2000;20:452–457.
  9. Hall NC, Hua Y, Kothari RU, de Courten-Myers GM, Broderick JP, Brott TG, Wagner KR: Phenyl-tert-butylnitrone protects the oxidatively sensitive enzyme creatine kinase in experimental intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke 1998;29:273.
  10. McCord JM: Iron, free radicals, and oxidative injury. Semin Hematol 1998;35:5–12.
  11. Dean RT, Fu S, Stocker R, Davies MJ: Biochemistry and pathology of radical-mediated protein oxidation. Biochem J 1997;324:1–18.
  12. Stadtman ER, Berlett BS: Reactive oxygen-mediated protein oxidation in aging and disease. Drug Metab Rev 1998;30:225–243.
  13. Abraham NG, Drummond GS, Lutton JD, Kappas A: The biological significance and physiological role of heme oxygenase. Cell Physiol Biochem 1996;6:129–168.
  14. Maines MD: The heme oxygenase system: A regulator of second messenger gases. Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 1997;37:517–554.
  15. Dwyer BE, Nishimura RN, Lu SY, Alcaraz A: Transient induction of heme oxygenase after cortical stab wound injury. Brain Res Mol Brain Res 1996;38:251–259.
  16. Mautes AE, Kim DH, Sharp FR, Panter S, Sato M, Maida N, Bergeron M, Guenther K, Noble LJ: Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the contused spinal cord of the rat. Brain Res 1998;795:17–24.
  17. Richmon JD, Fukuda K, Maida N, Sato M, Bergeron M, Sharp FR, Panter SS, Noble LJ: Induction of heme oxygenase-1 after hyperosmotic opening of the blood-brain barrier. Brain Res 1998;780:108–118.
  18. Wagner KR, Xi G, Hua Y, Kleinholz M, de Courten-Myers GM, Myers RE, Broderick JP, Brott TG: Intracerebral hemorrhage model in pigs: Rapid plasma protein accumulation and edema development in perihematomal white matter. Stroke 1996;27:490–497.
  19. Xi G, Wagner KR, Keep RF, Hua Y, de Courten-Myers GM, Broderick JP, Brott TG, Hoff JT: Role of blood clot formation on early edema development after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke 1998;29:2580–2586.
  20. Si QS, Nakamura Y, Kataoka K: Albumin enhances superoxide production in cultured microglia. Glia 1997;21:413–418.
  21. Wagner KR, Hua Y, de Courten-Myers GM, Broderick JP, Nishimura RN, Lu SY, Dwyer BE: Tin-mesoporphyrin, a potent heme oxygenase inhibitor, for treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage: In vivo and in vitro studies. Cell Mol Biol 2000;46:597–608.
  22. Huang FP, Xi G, Keep RF, Hua Y, Nemoianu A, Hoff JT: Brian edema after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage: Role of hemoglobin degradation products. J Neurosurg 2002;96:287–293.
  23. Hall NC, Packard BA, Hall CL, Wagner KR: Protein carbonyl formation following in vivo intracerebral hemorrhage and in vitro iron-induced oxidative stress. J Neurochem 1999;72:S33.
  24. Packard BA, Hall NC, Hall CL, Wagner KR: Protein carbonyl formation is comparable following whole blood or plasma infusions into porcine white matter. Soc Neurosci Abs 1999;25:1849.
  25. Wagner KR, Knight J, Packard BA, de Courten-Myers GM, Smulian AG, Broderick JP: Rapid nuclear factor kappaB activation and cytokine and heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in edematous white matter after porcine intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke 2001;32:327.
  26. Wagner KR, Xi G, Hua Y, Kleinholz M, de Courten-Myers GM, Myers RE: Early metabolic alterations in edematous perihematomal brain regions following experimental intracerebral hemorrhage. J Neurosurg 1998;88:1058–1065.
  27. Hall NC, Packard B, Hall C, Wagner KR: Protein oxidation and enzyme susceptibility in white and gray matter with in vitro oxidative stress: Relevance to brain injury from intracerebral hemorrhage. Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand) 2000;46:673–683.
  28. Shacter E, Williams JA, Lim M, Levine RL: Differential susceptibility of plasma proteins to oxidative modification: Examination by Western blot immunoassay. Free Radic Biol Med 1994;17:429–437.
  29. Dozois CM, Oswald E, Gautier N, Serthelon JP, Fairbrother JM, Oswald IP: A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method to analyze porcine cytokine gene expression. Vet Immunol Immunopathol 1997;58:287–300.
  30. Diatchenko L, Lukyanov S, Lau YF, Siebert PD: Suppression subtractive hybridization: A versatile method for identifying differentially expressed genes. Methods Enzymol 1999;303:349–380.
  31. Suzuki J, Ebina T: Sequential Changes in Tissue Surrounding ICH; in Pia HW, Longmaid C, Zierski J (eds): Spontaneous Intracerebral Hematomas: Advances in Diagnosis and Therapy. Berlin, Springer, 1980, pp 121–128.
  32. Jenkins A, Mendelow AD, Graham DI, Nath FP, Teasdale GM: Experimental intracerebral hematoma: The role of blood constituents in early ischemia. Br J Neurosurg 1990;4:45–52.
  33. Lee KR, Kawai N, Kim S, Sagher O, Hoff JT: Mechanisms of edema formation after intracerebral hemorrhage: Effects of thrombin on cerebral blood flow, blood-brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in a rat model. J Neurosurg 1997;86:272–278.
  34. Nishino A, Suzuki M, Ohtani H, Motohashi O, Umezawa K, Nagura H, Yoshimoto T: Thrombin may contribute to the pathophysiology of central nervous system injury. J Neurotrauma 1993;10:167–179.
  35. Murakami K, Kawase M, Konda T, Chan PH: Cellular accumulation of extravasated serum protein and DNA fragmentation following vasogenic edema. J Neurotrauma 1998;15:825–835.
  36. Matz PG, Lewen A, Chan PH: Neuronal, but not microglial, accumulation of extravasated serum proteins after intracerebral hemolysate exposure is accompanied by cytochrome c release and DNA fragmentation. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 2001;21:921–928.
  37. Matsuoka Y, Kitamura Y, Kakimura J, Taniguchi T: Expression of heme oxygenase-1 mediated by non-NMDA and metabotropic receptors in glial cells: Possible involvement of reactive oxygen species production and protein kinase C activation. Neuropharmacology 1999;38:825–834.
  38. Gonzalez-Scarano F, Baltuch G: Microglia as mediators of inflammatory and degenerative diseases. Annu Rev Neurosci 1999;22:219–240.
  39. Nakaso K, Kitayama M, Mizuta E, Fukuda H, Ishii T, Nakashima K, Yamada K: Co-induction of heme oxygenase-1 and peroxiredoxin I in astrocytes and microglia around hemorrhagic region in the rat brain. Neurosci Lett 2000;293:49–52.
  40. Dore S, Sampei K, Goto S, Alkayed NJ, Guastella D, Blackshaw S, Gallagher M, Traystman RJ, Hurn PD, Koehler RC, Snyder SH: Heme oxygenase-2 is neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia. Mol Med 1999;5:56–63.
  41. Panahian N, Yoshiura M, Maines MD: Overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 is neuroprotective in a model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in transgenic mice. J Neurochem 1999;72:1187–1203.
  42. Chen K, Gunter K, Maines MD: Neurons overexpressing heme oxygenase-1 resist oxidative stress-mediated cell death. J Neurochem 2000;75:304–313.
  43. Suttner DM, Dennery PA: Reversal of HO-1 related cytoprotection with increased expression is due to reactive iron. FASEB J 1999;13:1800–1809.
  44. Lamb NJ, Quinlan GJ, Mumby S, Evans TW, Gutteridge JM: Haem oxygenase shows pro-oxidant activity in microsomal and cellular systems: Implications for the release of low-molecular-mass iron. Biochem J 1999;344:153–158.
  45. Schipper HM: Heme oxygenase-1: Role in brain aging and neurodegeneration. Exp Gerontol 2000;35:821–830.
  46. Dwyer BE, Lu SY, Laitinen JT, Nishimura RN: Protective properties of tin- and manganese-centered porphyrins against hydrogen peroxide-mediated injury in rat astroglial cells. J Neurochem 1998;71:2497–2504.
  47. Kadoya C, Domino EF, Yang GY, Stern JD, Betz AL: Preischemic but not postischemic zinc protoporphyrin treatment reduces infarct size and edema accumulation after temporary focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Stroke 1995;26:1035–1038.
  48. Lavrovsky Y, Schwartzman ML, Levere RD, Kappas A, Abraham NG: Identification of binding sites for transcription factors NF-kappa B and AP-2 in the promoter region of the human heme oxygenase 1 gene. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1994;91:5897–5991.
  49. Wagner KR, Broderick JP: Hemorrhagic Stroke; in Lo EH, Marwah J (eds): Neuroprotection. Scottsdale, Prominent Press, 2001, pp 471–508.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Iron: Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration

Received: May 01, 2002
Accepted: June 25, 2002
Published online: October 28, 2002
Issue release date: October 2002

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0378-5866 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9859 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DNE


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.