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General Cardiology

Aetiology of Heart Failure as Seen from a National Cardiac Referral Centre in Africa

Amoah A.G.B.a,b · Kallen C.b

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aDepartment of Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Ghana Medical School and bNational Cardiothoracic Centre, Korle Bu, Accra, Ghana

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Cardiology 2000;93:11–18

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of General Cardiology

Published online: July 04, 2000
Issue release date: June 2000

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 7

ISSN: 0008-6312 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9751 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CRD

Abstract

572 consecutive patients with heart failure referred to the National Cardiothoracic Centre, Accra, Ghana, over a 4-year period were evaluated for the aetiology of heart failure using two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography with colour flow. The mean age of the subjects with heart failure was 42.3 ± 0.9 years. The male to female ratio was 1.2:1.0. Combined heart failure was seen in 50.5% of subjects. Peak incidence of heart failure occurred in the 5th decade. The main causes of heart failure were hypertension (21.3%; n = 122), rheumatic heart disease (20.1%; n = 115) and cardiomyopathy (16.8%; n = 96). Congenital heart disease and coronary artery disease accounted for 9.8 and 10% of cases, respectively. The commonest rheumatic valvular lesion was mitral regurgitation (78%). Dilated cardiomyopathy was the commonest form of idiopathic cardiomyopathy (67.7%; n = 65). Endomyocardial fibrosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy accounted for 22.9% (n = 22) and 9.4% (n = 9), respectively, of cardiomyopathies.

© 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of General Cardiology

Published online: July 04, 2000
Issue release date: June 2000

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 7

ISSN: 0008-6312 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9751 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CRD


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