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X chromosome inactivation

X chromosome inactivation, differentiation, and DNA methylation revisited, with a tribute to Susumu Ohno

Riggs A.D.

Author affiliations

Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute of The City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (USA)

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Cytogenet Genome Res 99:17–24 (2002)

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of X chromosome inactivation

Received: November 30, 2002
Accepted: January 27, 2003
Published online: August 14, 2003
Issue release date: 2002

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

X chromosome inactivation and DNA methylation are reviewed, with emphasis on the contributions of Susumu Ohno and the predictions made in my 1975 paper (Riggs, 1975), in which I proposed the “maintenance methylase” model for somatic inheritance of methylation patterns and suggested that DNA methylation would be involved in mammalian X chromosome inactivation and development. The maintenance methylase model is discussed and updated to consider methylation patterns in cell populations that have occasional, stochastic methylation changes by de novo methylation or demethylation, either active or passive. The “way station” model for the spread of X inactivation by LINE-1 elements is also considered, and some recent results from my laboratory are briefly reviewed.   

© 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of X chromosome inactivation

Received: November 30, 2002
Accepted: January 27, 2003
Published online: August 14, 2003
Issue release date: 2002

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR


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