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X chromosome inactivation

Escape from X inactivation

Disteche C.M.a,b · Filippova G.N.c · Tsuchiya K.D.d

Author affiliations

Departments of aPathology and bMedicine, University of Washington, Seattle WA; cDivision of Human Biology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle WA; and d Division of Genetic Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville TN (USA)

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Cytogenet Genome Res 99:36–43 (2002)

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of X chromosome inactivation

Published online: August 14, 2003
Issue release date: 2002

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

Although the process of X inactivation in mammalian cells silences the majority of genes on the inactivated X chromosome, some genes escape this chromosome-wide silencing. Genes that escape X inactivation present a unique opportunity to study the process of silencing and the mechanisms that protect some genes from being turned off. In this review, we will discuss evolutionary aspects of escape from X inactivation, in relation to the divergence of the sex chromosomes. Molecular characteristics, expression, and epigenetic modifications of genes that escape will be presented, including their developmental regulation and the implications of chromatin domains along the X chromosome in modeling the escape process.   

© 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of X chromosome inactivation

Published online: August 14, 2003
Issue release date: 2002

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR


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