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Evolution of sex chromosomes

The evolution of sex chromosomes

Ayling L.-J. · Griffin D.K.

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Cell and Chromosome Biology Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Brunel University, Uxbridge (UK)

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Cytogenet Genome Res 99:125–140 (2002)

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Evolution of sex chromosomes

Published online: August 14, 2003
Issue release date: 2002

Number of Print Pages: 16
Number of Figures: 18
Number of Tables: 5

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

Mammalian sex chromosomes appear, behave and function differently than the autosomes, passing on their genes in a unique sex-linked manner. The publishing of Ohno’s hypothesis provided a framework for discussion of sex chromosome evolution, allowing it to be developed and challenged numerous times. In this report we discuss the pressures that drove the evolution of sex and the mechanisms by which it occurred. We concentrate on how the sex chromosomes evolved in mammals, discussing the various hypotheses proposed and the evidence supporting them.   

© 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Evolution of sex chromosomes

Published online: August 14, 2003
Issue release date: 2002

Number of Print Pages: 16
Number of Figures: 18
Number of Tables: 5

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR


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