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Beyond Laminar Fate: Toward a Molecular Classification of Cortical Projection/Pyramidal Neurons

Hevner R.F.a · Daza R.A.M.a · Rubenstein J.L.R.c · Stunnenberg H.d · Olavarria J.F.b · Englund C.a

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Pathology, University of Washington, Harborview Medical Center and bDepartment of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash., and cDepartment of Psychiatry, Nina Ireland Laboratories, UCSF, SanFrancisco, Calif., USA; dDepartment of Molecular Biology, University of Nijmegen, Nijmegen, TheNetherlands

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Dev Neurosci 2003;25:139–151

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Received: February 25, 2003
Accepted: March 21, 2003
Published online: September 15, 2003
Issue release date: September 2003

Number of Print Pages: 13
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0378-5866 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9859 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DNE

Abstract

Cortical projection neurons exhibit diverse morphological, physiological, and molecular phenotypes, but it is unknown how many distinct types exist. Many projection cell phenotypes are associated with laminar fate (radial position), but each layer may also contain multiple types of projection cells. We have investigated two hypotheses: (1) that different projection cell types exhibit characteristic molecular expression profiles and (2) that laminar fates are determined primarily by molecular phenotype. We found that several transcription factors were differentially expressed by projection neurons, even within the same layer: Otx1 and Er81, for example, were expressed by different neurons in layer 5. Retrograde tracing showed that Er81 was expressed in corticospinal and corticocortical neurons. In contrast, Otx1 has been detected only in corticobulbar neurons [Weimann et al., Neuron 1999;24:819–831]. Birthdating demonstrated that different molecularly defined types were produced sequentially, in overlapping waves. Cells adopted laminar fates characteristic of their molecular phenotypes, regardless of cell birthday. Molecular markers also revealed the locations of different projection cell types in the malformed cortex of reeler mice. These studies suggest that molecular profiles can be used advantageously for classifying cortical projection cells, for analyzing their neurogenesis and fate specification, and for evaluating cortical malformations.

© 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Received: February 25, 2003
Accepted: March 21, 2003
Published online: September 15, 2003
Issue release date: September 2003

Number of Print Pages: 13
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0378-5866 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9859 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DNE


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