Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.



Login with Facebook

Forgot your password?

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login
(Shibboleth or Open Athens)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Reproductive Neuroendocrinology

Genistein, a Phytoestrogen, Effectively Modulates Luteinizing Hormone and Prolactin Secretion in Ovariectomized Ewes during Seasonal Anestrus

Romanowicz K. · Misztal T. · Barcikowski B.

Author affiliations

Kielanowski Institute of Animal Physiology and Nutrition, Polish Academy of Sciences, Jabłonna n/Warsaw, Poland

Related Articles for ""

Neuroendocrinology 2004;79:73–81

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information












By signing up for MyKarger you will automatically participate in our year-End raffle.
If you Then Do Not wish To participate, please uncheck the following box.

Yes, I wish To participate In the year-End raffle And Get the chance To win some Of our most interesting books, And other attractive prizes.


I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information












By signing up for MyKarger you will automatically participate in our year-End raffle.
If you Then Do Not wish To participate, please uncheck the following box.

Yes, I wish To participate In the year-End raffle And Get the chance To win some Of our most interesting books, And other attractive prizes.


I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Reproductive Neuroendocrinology

Received: June 26, 2003
Accepted: December 30, 2003
Published online: March 12, 2004
Issue release date: February 2004

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEN

Abstract

Through binding with estrogen receptors, phytoestrogens, plant-derived estrogen-like compounds, affect numerous reproductive functions. It is not known whether these compounds are capable of evoking effective changes in luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin (PRL) secretion in ewes by acting directly within the central nervous system (CNS). The hypothesis studied was that genistein, infused for several hours into the third ventricle, could immediately affect LH and PRL secretion in ovariectomized (OVX) ewes during seasonal anestrus. Two doses of genistein, 1 µg/100 µl/h (total 4 µg, n = 7) and 10 µg/100 µl/h (total 40 µg, n = 7), were infused intracerebroventricularly from 12.00 to 16.00 h and blood samples were collected from 8.00 to 20.00 h at 10-min intervals. Randomly selected ewes were infused with a vehicle (control, n = 5). The mean plasma LH concentration in control ewes was significantly (p < 0.01) higher during infusion of the vehicle than before the infusion. It remained on an insignificantly changed level after the infusion. The frequency of LH pulses in control ewes did not differ significantly before, during, or after vehicle infusion. In ewes infused with a lower dose of genistein, plasma LH concentrations decreased significantly (p < 0.001) after the infusion, as compared with the values noted before and during genistein infusion. Only a tendency towards a decrease in LH pulse frequency occurred after infusion of a lower dose of genistein. In ewes infused with a higher dose of genistein, the plasma LH concentration decreased significantly (p < 0.01) after phytoestrogen administration as compared with the values noted before and during infusion. The frequency of LH pulses was also significantly (p < 0.01) lower after genistein administration. Because the changes in PRL secretion were more dynamic in response to genistein infusion, the statistical analysis included 2-hour periods. The mean plasma PRL concentration in control animals was significantly enhanced (p < 0.01) only during the first 2-hour period of sampling. After that it decreased and remained on an unchanged level up to the end of sampling. Similar changes in PRL secretion were observed in both experimental groups before genistein infusion. In contrast, significant (p < 0.01 to p < 0.001) increases in PRL concentration were noted regularly during and shortly after the genistein infusion in either low-dose or high-dose genistein-infused ewes, compared with the concentrations noted before genistein treatment. Plasma PRL concentrations during and after genistein infusion in both experimental groups were also significantly higher than the control (p < 0.01 to p < 0.001). The presented data demonstrate that genistein, a phytoestrogen, may effectively modulate LH and PRL secretion in OVX ewes by acting within the CNS.

© 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel


References

  1. Adams RN: Detection of the effects of phytoestrogens on sheep and cattle. J Anim Sci 1995;73:1509–1515.
  2. Lundh TJO, Pettersson HI, Martinsson KA: Comparative levels of free and conjugated plant estrogens in blood plasma of sheep and cattle fed estrogenic silage. J Agric Food Chem 1990;38:1530–1534.
  3. King RA, Mano MM, Head RJ: Assessment of isoflavonoid concentrations in Australian bovine milk samples. J Dairy Res 1998;65:479–489.
  4. Chang HC, Churchwell MI, Delclos KB, Newbold RR, Doerge DR: Mass spectrometric determination of genistein tissue distribution in diet-exposed Sprague-Dawley rats. J Nutr 2000;130:1963–1970.
  5. Kuiper GGJM, Carlsson B, Grandien K, Enmark E, Haggbland J, Nilsson S, Gustafsson J-A: Comparison of the ligand binding specificity and transcript tissue distribution of estrogen receptors α and β. Endocrinology 1997;138:863–870.
  6. Kuiper GGJM, Lemmen JG, Carlsson B, Corton JC, Safe SH, van der Saag PT, van der Burg B, Gustafsson JA: Interaction of estrogenic chemicals and phytoestrogens with estrogen receptor β. Endocrinology 1998;139:4252–4263.
  7. Cassidy A, Faughnan M: Phyto-oestrogens through the life cycle. Proc Nutr Soc 2000;59:489–496
  8. Firth JF, Salamon S, Maxwell WMC: Observations on oestrus without ovulation in sheep. Theriogenology 1977;8:186.
    External Resources
  9. Adams NR: Morphological changes in the organs of ewes grazing oestrogenic subterranean clover. Res Vet Sci 1977;22:216–221.
  10. Newsome FE, Kitts WD: Effects of alfalfa consumption on estrogen levels in ewes. Can J Anim Sci 1977;57:531–535.
  11. Nwannenna A, Madej A, Lundh TJ-O, Fredriksson G: Effects of oestrogenic silage on some clinical and endocrinological parameters in ovariectomized heifers. Acta Vet Scand 1994;35:173–183.
  12. Nwannenna A, Lundh TJ-O, Madej A, Fredriksson G, Bjornhag G: Clinical changes in ovariectomized ewes exposed to phytoestrogens and oestradiol-17β implants. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1995;208:92–97.
  13. McGarvey C, Cates PS, Brooks AN, Swanson IA, Milligen SR, Coen CW, O’Byrne KT: Phytoestrogens and GnRH pulse generator activity and pituitary LH release in the rat. Endocrinology 2001;142:1202–1208.
  14. Mathieson RA, Kitts WD: Binding of phyto-estrogen and oestradiol-17β by cytoplasmic receptors in the pituitary gland and hypothalamus of the ewe. J Endocrinol 1980;85:317–325.
  15. Legan SJ, Karsch FJ, Foster DL: The endocrine control of seasonal reproductive function in the ewe: A marked change in response to the negative feedback action of estradiol on luteinizing hormone secretion. Endocrinology 1977;101:818–821.
  16. Hrabovszky E, Shunghrue PJ, Merchenthaler I, Hajszan T, Carpenter CD, Liposits Z, Petersen SL: Detection of estrogen receptor-beta messenger ribonucleic acid and 125I-estrogen binding sites in luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone neurons of the rat brain. Endocrinology 2000;141:3506–3509.
  17. Hrabovszky E, Steinhauser A, Barabas K, Shunghrue PJ, Petersen SL, Merchenthaler I, Liposits Z: Estrogen receptor-β immunoreactivity in luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone neurons of the rat brain. Endocrinology 2000;142:3261–3264.
    External Resources
  18. Herbison AE, Robinson JE, Skinner DC: Distribution of estrogen receptor-immunoreactive cells in the preoptic area of the ewe: Co-localization with glutamic acid decarboxylase but not luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. Neuroendocrinology 1993;57:751–759.
  19. Thiery J-C, Martin GB, Tillet Y, Caldani M, Quentin M, Jamain C, Ravault J-P: Role of hypothalamic catecholamines in the regulation of luteinizing hormone and prolactin secretion in the ewe during seasonal anestrus. Neuroendocrinology 1989;49:80–87.
  20. Gallegos-Sanchez J, Delaleu B, Caraty A, Malpaux B, Thiery JC: Estradiol acts locally within the retrochiasmatic area to inhibit pulsatile luteinizing hormone release in the female sheep during anestrus. Biol Reprod 1997;56:1544–1549.
  21. Caraty A, Fabre-Nys C, Delaleu B, Locatelli A, Bruneau G, Karsch FJ, Herbison A: Evidence that the mediobasal hypothalamus is the primary site of action of estradiol in inducing the preovulatory gonadotropin releasing hormone surge in the ewe. Endocrinology 1998;139:1752–1760.
  22. Anderson GM, Connors JM, Hardy SL, Valent M, Goodman RL: Oestradiol microimplants in the ventromedial preoptic area inhibit secretion of luteinizing hormone via dopamine neurones in anoestrous ewes. J Neuroendocrinol 2001;13:1051–1058.
  23. Ben-Jonathan N, Arbogast LA, Hyde JF: Neuroendocrine regulation of prolactin release. Prog Neurobiol 1989;33:399–447.
  24. Freeman ME, Kanyicska B, Lerant A, Nagy G: Prolactin: Structure, function and regulation of secretion. Physiol Rev 2000;80:1523–1631.
  25. Traczyk W, Przekop F: Methods of investigation of the function of the hypothalamus and hypophysis in chronic experiments in sheep. Acta Physiol Pol 1963:14:217–226.
  26. Stupnicki R, Madej A: Radioimmunoassay of LH in blood plasma of farm animals. Endokrinologie 1976;68:6–13.
  27. Wolińska E, Polkowska J, Domański E: The hypothalamic centers involved in the control of production and release of prolactin in sheep. J Endocrinol 1977;73:21–29.
  28. Kochman H, Kochman K: Purification of ovine and bovine prolactins on DEAE cellulose chromatography and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Bull Acad Sci Pol 1977;25:67–70.
  29. Merriam GR, Wachter KW: Algorithms for the study of episodic hormone secretion. Am J Physiol 1982;243:E310–E318.
  30. Caraty A, Locatelli A, Martin GB: Biphasic response in the secretion of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone in ovariectomized ewes injected with oestradiol. J Endocrinol 1989;123:375–382.
  31. Gallegos-Sanchez J, Picard S, Delaleu B, Malpaux B: Initiation of the oestradiol-induced inhibition of pulsatile LH secretion in ewes under long days: Comparison of peripheral versus central treatment and neurochemical correlates. J Endocrinol 1996;151:19–28.
  32. Meyer SL, Goodman RL: Neurotransmitters involved in mediating the steroid-dependent suppression of pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion in anestrous ewes: Effects of receptor antagonists. Endocrinology 1985;116:2054–2061.
  33. Kuljis RO, Advis JP: Immunocytochemical and physiological evidence of synapse between dopamine- and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-containing neurons in the ewe median eminence. Endocrinology 1989;124:1579–1581.
  34. Viguie C, Thibault J, Thiery J-C, Tillet Y, Malpaux B: Photoperiodic modulation of monoamines and amino-acids involved in the control of prolactin and LH secretion in the ewe: Evidence for a regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase activity. J Neuroendocrinol 1996;8:465–474.
  35. Gayrard V, Malpaux B, Tillet Y, Thiery J-C: Estradiol increases tyrosine hydroxylase activity of the A15 nucleus dopaminergic neurons during long days in the ewe. Biol Reprod 1994;50:1168–1177.
  36. Goodman RL, Thiery JC, Delaleu B, Malpaux B: Estradiol increases multi-unit electrical activity in the A15 area of ewes exposed to inhibitory photoperiods. Biol Reprod 2000;63:1352–1357.
  37. Scott CJ, Tilbrook AJ, Simmons DM, Rawson JA, Chu S, Fuller PJ, Ing NH, Clarke IJ: The distribution of cells containing estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and ERβ messenger ribonucleic acid in the preoptic area and hypothalamus of the sheep: Comparison of males and females. Endocrinology 2000;141:2951–2962.
  38. Hardy SL, Anderson GM, Valent M, Connors JM, Goodman RL: Evidence that estrogen receptor alpha, but not beta, mediates seasonal changes in the response of the ovine retrochiasmatic area to estradiol. Biol Reprod 2003;68:846–852.
  39. Stefanovic I, Adrian B, Jansen HT, Lehman MN, Goodman RL: The ability of estradiol to induce fos expression in a subset of estrogen receptor-α-containing neurons in the preoptic area of the ewe depends on reproductive status. Endocrinology 2000;141:190–196.
  40. Goubillon ML, Delaleu B, Tillet Y, Caraty A, Herbison AE: Localization of estrogen-receptive neurons projecting to the GnRH neuron-containing rostral preoptic area of the ewe. Neuroendocrinology 1999;70:228–236.
  41. Dixon RA, Ferreira D: Genistein. Phytochemistry 2002;60:205–211.
  42. Rozell TG, Keisler DH: Effects of oestradiol on LH, FSH and prolactin in ovariectomized ewes. J Reprod Fertil 1990;88:645–653.
  43. Stahl S, Chun TY, Gray WG: Phytoestrogens act as estrogen agonist in an estrogen-responsive pituitary cell line. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 1998;152:41–48.
  44. Shin SH: Dopamine-induced inhibition of prolactin release from cultured adenohypophysial cells: Spare receptor for dopamine. Life Sci 1978;22:67–74.
  45. Lamberts SWJ, MacLeod RM: Regulation of prolactin secretion at the level of the lactotrophs. Physiol Rev 1990;70:279–318.
  46. Ben-Jonathan N, Hnasko R: Dopamine as a prolactin (PRL) inhibitor. Endocr Rev 2001;22:724–763.
  47. Blum M, McEven BS, Roberts JL: Transcriptional analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression in the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons of the rat arcuate nucleus after estrogen treatment. J Biol Chem 1987;262:817–821.
  48. Pasqualini C, Guibert B, Leviel V: Short-term inhibitory effect of estradiol on tyrosine hydroxylase activity in tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons in vitro. J Neurochem 1993;60:1707–1713.
  49. Arbogast LA, Hyde JF: Estradiol attenuates the forskolin-induced increase in hypothalamic tyrosine hydroxylase activity. Neuroendocrinology 2000;71:219–227.
  50. Batailler M, Blache D, Thibault J, Tillet Y: Immunohistochemical colocalization of tyrosine hydroxylase and estradiol receptors in the sheep arcuate nucleus. Neurosci Lett 1992;146:125–130.
  51. Lehman MN, Karsch FJ: Do gonadotropin-releasing hormone, tyrosine hydroxylase-, and beta-endorphin-immunoreactive neurons contain estrogen receptors? A double-label immunocytochemical study in the Suffolk ewe. Endocrinology 1993;133:887–895.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Reproductive Neuroendocrinology

Received: June 26, 2003
Accepted: December 30, 2003
Published online: March 12, 2004
Issue release date: February 2004

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEN


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.