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Case Report

Hypokalemia and Alkalosis in Adipsic Hypernatremia Are Not Associated with Hyperaldosteronism

Torchinsky M.Y.a · Deputy S.b · Rambeau F.a · Chalew S.A.a

Author affiliations

Departments of aEndocrinology and bNeurology (SD) at the Children’s Hospital of New Orleans and Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans, New Orleans, La., USA

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Horm Res 2004;62:187–190

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Case Report

Received: November 28, 2003
Accepted: April 20, 2004
Published online: October 21, 2004
Issue release date: October 2004

Number of Print Pages: 4
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1663-2818 (Print)
eISSN: 1663-2826 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HRP

Abstract

Idiopathic adipsic hypernatremia (AH) is a rare disorder associated with hypokalemia and alkalosis. Hypokalemic alkalosis has been presumed to be secondary to hyperaldosteronism. We evaluated plasma renin activity, serum aldosterone, serum and urine electrolytes in a 17-year-old patient with AH on several occasions. Despite evidence of mild dehydration, serum Na >160 and K <3.2, aldosterone levels were suppressed and plasma renin activity was not elevated. Urine Na and K were not conserved. We also examined electrolyte and hormone levels in previously reported cases of AH. Aldosterone levels were not increased in any of the cases when measured. Renin secretion was increased in 2 patients. Among the compiled cases serum K was inversely correlated with serum Na (r = –0.73, p < 0.002, n = 15). Hypokalemia and alkalosis occurring in AH are not associated with secondary hyperaldosteronism. Patients with AH may have chronic renal losses of potassium leading to hypokalemia and alkalosis.

© 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Case Report

Received: November 28, 2003
Accepted: April 20, 2004
Published online: October 21, 2004
Issue release date: October 2004

Number of Print Pages: 4
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1663-2818 (Print)
eISSN: 1663-2826 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HRP


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