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Short Communication

Lipopolysaccharide Contamination of β-Lactoglobulin Affects the Immune Response against Intraperitoneally and Orally Administered Antigen

Brix S. · Kjær T.M.R. · Barkholt V. · Frøkiær H.

Author affiliations

BioCentrum-DTU, Biochemistry and Nutrition Group, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark

Related Articles for ""

Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2004;135:216–220

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Short Communication

Received: March 01, 2004
Accepted: July 20, 2004
Published online: November 30, 2004
Issue release date: November 2004

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA

Abstract

Background: Microbial components in the environment are potent activators of the immune system with capacity to shift the active immune response towards priming of Th1 and/or Th2 cells. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a cell-wall component of Gram-negative bacteria, is extensively present in food products like cow’s milk. It is not well established, however, how this presence of LPS affects oral tolerance induction. Methods: We studied the effect of LPS contamination in a commercial preparation of the cow milk protein β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) on antigen-specific immune responses. IgG1/IgG2a production upon intraperitoneal immunization without adjuvant was measured, and oral tolerance induction against β-LG after administration of either an aqueous solution or water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion of β-LG was evaluated. Results: LPS contamination of β-LG provoked a β-LG-specific IgG2a response, as well as an enhanced β-LG-specific IgG1 response upon intraperitoneal immunization. Oral tolerance induction to β-LG was induced by aqueous solutions of β-LG with and without LPS administration. Conversely, oral administration of w/o-emulsified β-LG prevented oral tolerance to β-LG only when the β-LG was contaminated with LPS. Conclusions: LPS contamination of an aqueous protein solution does not affect oral tolerance induction, whereas LPS present in emulsion prevents oral tolerance induction towards the food protein.

© 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Short Communication

Received: March 01, 2004
Accepted: July 20, 2004
Published online: November 30, 2004
Issue release date: November 2004

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA


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