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Special Article

Alexithymia, Interhemispheric Transfer, and Right Hemispheric Specialization: A Critical Review

Tabibnia G. · Zaidel E.

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Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif., USA

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Psychother Psychosom 2005;74:81–92

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Special Article

Published online: February 23, 2005
Issue release date: February 2005

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0033-3190 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0348 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/PPS

Abstract

Background: One neural model of alexithymia relates the condition to poor interhemispheric transfer, while another model associates it with a disturbance in right hemisphere activity. Methods: The available empirical evidence directly relating alexithymia to a deficit in interhemispheric transfer and/or in right hemisphere activity is critically reviewed. Results: The interhemispheric transfer studies have related alexithymia to a deficit in transfer, but the nature and directionality of the transfer deficit have yet to be determined. Many of the hemispheric specialization studies do not relate alexithymia to a right hemisphere dysfunction. Shortcomings of these studies are reviewed. Conclusions: The hypothesis that alexithymia is related to a deficit in the right-to-left transfer of emotional information and to a right hemisphere impairment in emotion processing remains to be tested directly and definitively. Suggestions for future research are made.

© 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Special Article

Published online: February 23, 2005
Issue release date: February 2005

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0033-3190 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0348 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/PPS


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