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Review

Dermal Capillary Clearance: Physiology and Modeling

Kretsos K.a · Kasting G.B.b

Author affiliations

aUniversity at Buffalo, State University of New York, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Buffalo, N.Y., bUniversity of Cincinnati, College of Pharmacy, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

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Skin Pharmacol Appl Skin Physiol 2005;18:55–74

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review

Received: May 07, 2004
Accepted: July 10, 2004
Published online: March 10, 2005
Issue release date: March – April

Number of Print Pages: 20
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 8

ISSN: 1660-5527 (Print)
eISSN: 1660-5535 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/SPP

Abstract

Substances applied to the skin surface may permeate deeper tissue layers and pass into the body’s systemic circulation by entering blood or lymphatic vessels in the dermis. The purpose of this review is an in-depth analysis of the dermal clearance/exchange process and its constituents: transport through the interstitium, permeability of the microvascular barrier and removal via the circulation. We adapt an ‘engineering’ viewpoint with emphasis on quantifying the dermal microcirculatory physiology, providing the theoretical framework for the physics of key transport processes and reviewing the available computational clearance models in a comparative manner. Selected experimental data which may serve as valuable input to modeling attempts are also reported.

© 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review

Received: May 07, 2004
Accepted: July 10, 2004
Published online: March 10, 2005
Issue release date: March – April

Number of Print Pages: 20
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 8

ISSN: 1660-5527 (Print)
eISSN: 1660-5535 (Online)

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