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Retrotransposable Elements, Retrotransposition and Genome Evolution

LINEs, SINEs and processed pseudogenes: parasitic strategies for genome modeling

Dewannieux M. · Heidmann T.

Author affiliations

Unité des Rétrovirus Endogènes et Eléments Rétroïdes des Eucaryotes Supérieurs, UMR 8122 CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)

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Cytogenet Genome Res 110:35–48 (2005)

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Article / Publication Details

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Abstract of Retrotransposable Elements, Retrotransposition and Genome Evolution

Published online: July 21, 2005
Issue release date: July 2005

Number of Print Pages: 14
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

Two major classes of retrotransposons have invaded eukaryotic genomes: the LTR retrotransposons closely resembling the proviral integrated form of infectious retroviruses, and the non-LTR retrotransposons including the widespread, autonomous LINE elements. Here, we review the modeling effects of the latter class of elements, which are the most active in humans, and whose enzymatic machinery is subverted to generate a large series of “secondary” retroelements. These include the processed pseudogenes, naturally present in all eukaryotic genomes possessing non-LTR retroelements, and the very successful SINE elements such as the human Alu sequences which have evolved refined parasitic strategies to efficiently bypass the original “protectionist” cis-preference of LINEs for their own retrotransposition.   

© 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

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Abstract of Retrotransposable Elements, Retrotransposition and Genome Evolution

Published online: July 21, 2005
Issue release date: July 2005

Number of Print Pages: 14
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

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