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Evolution of Retrotransposable Elements

Mobile genetic elements and sexual reproduction

Arkhipova I.R.

Author affiliations

Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA and Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA (USA)

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Cytogenet Genome Res 110:372–382 (2005)

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Evolution of Retrotransposable Elements

Received: September 26, 2003
Accepted: January 02, 2004
Published online: July 21, 2005
Issue release date: July 2005

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

Transposable elements (TE) are prominent components of most eukaryotic genomes. In addition to their possible participation in the origin of sexual reproduction in eukaryotes, they may be also involved in its maintenance as important contributors to the deleterious mutation load. Comparative analyses of transposon content in the genomes of sexually reproducing and anciently asexual species may help to understand the contribution of different TE classes to the deleterious load. The apparent absence of deleterious retrotransposons from the genomes of ancient asexuals is in agreement with the hypothesis that they may play a special role in the maintenance of sexual reproduction and in early extinction for which most species are destined upon the abandonment of sex.   

© 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Evolution of Retrotransposable Elements

Received: September 26, 2003
Accepted: January 02, 2004
Published online: July 21, 2005
Issue release date: July 2005

Number of Print Pages: 11
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR


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