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Original Paper

Application of Logistic Regression to Case-Control Association Studies Involving Two Causative Loci

North B.V.a · Curtis D.a · Sham P.C.b

Author affiliations

aAcademic Department of Psychiatry, Queen Mary’s School of Medicine and Dentistry, and bDepartment of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London, UK

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Hum Hered 2005;59:79–87

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: July 29, 2004
Accepted: November 14, 2004
Published online: May 17, 2005
Issue release date: May 2005

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 8

ISSN: 0001-5652 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0062 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HHE

Abstract

Models in which two susceptibility loci jointly influence the risk of developing disease can be explored using logistic regression analysis. Comparison of likelihoods of models incorporating different sets of disease model parameters allows inferences to be drawn regarding the nature of the joint effect of the loci.We have simulated case-control samples generated assuming different two-locus models and then analysed them using logistic regression. We show that this method is practicable and that, for the models we have used, it can be expected to allow useful inferences to be drawn from sample sizes consisting of hundreds of subjects. Interactions between loci can be explored, but interactive effects do not exactly correspond with classical definitions of epistasis. We have particularly examined the issue of the extent to which it is helpful to utilise information from a previously identified locus when investigating a second, unknown locus. We show that for some models conditional analysis can have substantially greater power while for others unconditional analysis can be more powerful. Hence we conclude that in general both conditional and unconditional analyses should be performed when searching for additional loci.

© 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: July 29, 2004
Accepted: November 14, 2004
Published online: May 17, 2005
Issue release date: May 2005

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 8

ISSN: 0001-5652 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0062 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HHE


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