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Originalarbeit · Original Article

Effectiveness of Balneotherapy in Chronic Low Back Pain – a Randomized Single-Blind Controlled Follow-up Study

Balogh Z.a · Ördögh J.a · Gász A.a · Német L.a · Bender T.b

Author affiliations

aKehidakustány Health Spa, Kehidakustány, bPolyclinic of the Hospitaller Brothers of St. John of God, Budapest, Hungary

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Forsch Komplementärmed Klass Naturheilkd 2005;12:196-201

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Originalarbeit · Original Article

Published online: August 29, 2005
Issue release date: August 2005

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 2504-2092 (Print)
eISSN: 2504-2106 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CMR

Abstract

Objective: Balneotherapy, a domain of medical science, focuses on utilizing the beneficial effects of medicinal waters. Low back pain is among the most prevalent musculoskeletal disorders affecting a large proportion of the population during their lifetime. Although small in number, all controlled studies published on this subject have demonstrated the benefits of balneotherapy. This present study was undertaken to compare the effects of hydrotherapy with mineral water vs. tap water on low back pain. Patients and Methods: A single-blind clinical study was carried out to appraise the therapeutic efficacy of reduced sulphurous water on 60 patients with low back pain. 30 subjects took baths in reduced sulphurous mineral water, whereas the other 30 patients used modified tap water of matching odor. Parameters determined at baseline, after balneo-/hydrotherapy, and at the end of the 3-month follow-up period included the results of the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score, the modified Oswestry index, mobility of the spine, antalgic posture, tenderness of the paravertebral muscles on palpation, the dose requirements for analgesics, and the efficacy assessed by the investigators and by the patients. Results: Bathing in mineral water resulted in a statistically significant improvement. This was reflected by the VAS (p < 0.01) and manifested by the mitigation of muscle spasm (p < 0.01), the alleviation of local tenderness (p < 0.01), the enhanced flexion-extension and rotation of the spine (p < 0.01) as well as by the improvement of the Schober’s index (p < 0.01). All these beneficial changes persisted as long as 3 months after the completion of balneotherapy. By contrast, hydrotherapy with tap water resulted only in the temporary improvement of just a single parameter: the VAS score improved significantly (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Balneotherapy in itself can alleviate low back pain. As demonstrated by this study, the analgesic efficacy and improvement of mobility accomplished by the use of mineral water is significantly superior to that afforded by hydrotherapy with tap water. Our results clearly establish the beneficial effects of mineral water. Moreover, it is a valuable adjunct to other forms of physical treatment as well as to pharmacotherapy.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Originalarbeit · Original Article

Published online: August 29, 2005
Issue release date: August 2005

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 2504-2092 (Print)
eISSN: 2504-2106 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CMR


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Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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