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Original Article

Circulating Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein and Paraoxonase Activity in Preeclampsia

Uzun H.a · Benian A.b · Madazlı R.b · Topçuoğlu M.A.c · Aydın S.a · Albayrak M.b

Author affiliations

Departments of aBiochemistry, and bObstetrics and Gynecology, Istanbul University, Cerrahpaşa Medical Faculty, Istanbul, and cDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Abant İzzet Baysal University, Medical Faculty, Abant, Turkey

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Gynecol Obstet Invest 2005;60:195–200

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: November 30, 2004
Accepted: November 05, 2005
Published online: November 09, 2005
Issue release date: November 2005

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 0378-7346 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-002X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/GOI

Abstract

Preeclampsia is one of the most frequent complications of pregnancy, however, little is known about its etiology. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and paraoxonase (PON1) activity in women with either preeclampsia or normotensive (NT) pregnancy. The study groups included 41 pregnant women with preeclampsia and 33 normotensive pregnant women. In all patients maternal serum total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides (TGs) were measured using enzymatic methods. Serum PON1 activities and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were measured by spectrophotometric methods, and oxLDL was measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Serum concentrations of lipid parameters (TC, LDL, VLDL, and TGs) were significantly higher in preeclampsia compared with NT controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, and p < 0.001, respectively). Serum concentrations of MDA and oxLDL were significantly higher, while PON1 activity was significantly lower in preeclampsia compared with NT controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). A positive correlation was detected between oxLDL and MDA (r = 0.876), and a negative correlation was detected between both MDA and oxLDL and PON1 (r = –0.837 and r = –0.759, respectively). Our data demonstrate that preeclampsia is associated with increased oxLDL and decreased PON1 activity. Elevated oxidative stress, oxLDL, dyslipidemia and decreased PON1 activities may cause vascular endothelial damage and contribute to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia.

© 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: November 30, 2004
Accepted: November 05, 2005
Published online: November 09, 2005
Issue release date: November 2005

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 0378-7346 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-002X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/GOI


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