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Original Paper

Age-Related Changes in Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Activity of Male C57BL/6J Mice

Dalm S.a · Enthoven L.a · Meijer O.C.a · van der Mark M.H.a · Karssen A.M.a, b · de Kloet E.R.a · Oitzl M.S.a

Author affiliations

aDivision of Medical Pharmacology, Leiden/Amsterdam Center for Drug Research, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands; bStanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences MSLS, Palo Alto, Calif., USA

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Neuroendocrinology 2005;81:372–380

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: April 28, 2005
Accepted: August 29, 2005
Published online: November 30, 2005
Issue release date: November 2005

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEN

Abstract

As there is little known about age-related changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis of mice, we determined the daily patterns of corticosterone secretion every 2 h, together with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release and central HPA axis markers in the morning and evening of 3-, 9- and 16-month-old male C57BL/6J mice. We observed that: (i) corticosterone secretion showed a distinct age-related circadian pattern. During the light period this was expressed by relative hypercorticism in 9-month-old mice and relative hypocorticism in 16-month-old mice. ACTH was elevated at 16 months of age; (ii) mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA expression in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in 9-month-old mice, whereas in 16-month-old mice, expression was similar to young animals. Circadian variation was modest in all age groups; (iii) the parvocellular hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) expressed very high vasopressin mRNA, which was subject to circadian variation in 3- and 9-month-old mice. Furthermore, significant levels of MR mRNA were expressed in the PVN. In conclusion, basal HPA axis activity and expression of its central regulatory markers are age-dependent in mice. This suggests that the capacity to adjust to environmental demands is either a function of age, or depends on different dynamics of the HPA axis.

© 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: April 28, 2005
Accepted: August 29, 2005
Published online: November 30, 2005
Issue release date: November 2005

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEN


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Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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