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Original Article

Sex-specific telomere length profiles and age-dependent erosion dynamics of individual chromosome arms in humans

Mayer S.a · Brüderlein S.a · Perner S.a · Waibel I.a · Holdenried A.a · Ciloglu N.a · Hasel C.a · Mattfeldt T.a · Nielsen K.V.b · Möller P.a

Author affiliations

aInstitute of Pathology, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); bDakoCytomation A/S, Glostrup (Denmark)

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Cytogenet Genome Res 112:194–201 (2006)

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Published online: February 10, 2006
Issue release date: February 2006

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

During aging, telomeres are gradually shortened, eventually leading to cellular senescence. By T/C-FISH (telomere/centromere-FISH), we investigated human telomere length differences on single chromosome arms of 205 individuals in different age groups and sexes. For all chromosome arms, we found a linear correlation between telomere length and donor age. Generally, males had shorter telomeres and higher attrition rates. Every chromosome arm had its individual age-specific telomere length and erosion pattern, resulting in an unexpected heterogeneity in chromosome- specific regression lines. This differential erosion pattern, however, does not seem to be accidental, since we found a correlation between average telomere length of single chromosome arms in newborns and their annual attrition rate. Apart from the above-mentioned sex-specific discrepancies, chromosome arm-specific telomere lengths were strikingly similar in men and women. This implies a mechanism that arm specifically regulates the telomere length independent of gender, thus leading to interchromosomal telomere variations.

© 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Published online: February 10, 2006
Issue release date: February 2006

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR


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