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Original Paper

Effect of Omalizumab on Adenosine 5′-Monophosphate Responsiveness in Subjects with Allergic Asthma

Prieto L.a · Gutiérrez V.a · Colás C.b · Tabar A.c · Pérez-Francés C.a · Bruno L.a · Uixera S.a

Author affiliations

aSección de Alergología, Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Valencia, bServicio de Alergología, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Zaragoza, and cSección de Alergología, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona, Spain

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Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2006;139:122–131

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: June 15, 2005
Accepted: September 26, 2005
Published online: February 01, 2006
Issue release date: January 2006

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA

Abstract

Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of omalizumab on bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine and adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP). Methods: Thirty-four subjects with mild to moderate allergic asthma were randomized to receive placebo (n = 16) or omalizumab (n = 18) subcutaneously during 12 weeks. Airway responsiveness to AMP was measured at baseline and after 4 and 12 weeks of treatment, whereas the response to methacholine was measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. Results: After 4 weeks of treatment, the increase in AMP PC20 (provocative concentration required to produce a 20% fall in FEV1) was significantly greater in the omalizumab group than in the placebo group, the mean difference in the change between the groups being 1.52 doubling concentrations (95% CI, 0.25–2.79, p = 0.02). Compared with baseline, the mean AMP PC20 values at 12 weeks were increased by 1.91 doubling concentrations with omalizumab (p < 0.001) and 1.01 doubling concentrations with placebo (p = 0.16), but changes were not significantly different between the treatment groups. Changes in methacholine PC20 values were not significantly different between the omalizumab and placebo groups. Conclusions: In subjects with allergic asthma, omalizumab reduces the response to AMP without decreasing the response to methacholine. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that the contribution of IgE to the development of AMP bronchoconstriction is more important than their role in the induction of methacholine hyperresponsiveness.

© 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: June 15, 2005
Accepted: September 26, 2005
Published online: February 01, 2006
Issue release date: January 2006

Number of Print Pages: 10
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1018-2438 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0097 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/IAA


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