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Original Article

The Locomotor Behavior of Callicebus brunneus and Callicebus torquatus

Lawler R.R.a, b · Ford S.M.b · Wright P.C.c · Easley S.P.d

Author affiliations

aDepartment of Anthropology, Boston University, Boston, Mass., bDepartment of Anthropology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Ill., cDepartment of Anthropology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, N.Y., and dEasley and Associates, Alamogordo, N. Mex., USA

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Folia Primatol 2006;77:228–239

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: July 18, 2005
Accepted: November 05, 2005
Published online: April 10, 2006
Issue release date: April 2006

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 5

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR

Abstract

This study presents data on the positional behavior of Callicebus torquatus and Callicebus brunneus collected from two different localities in Peru. C. brunneus primarily utilizes short-distance, bounding leaps, while C. torquatus relies predominantly on quadrupedal walking. Both species utilize small, horizontal and terminal branches more than any other substrate class. We relate the differences in locomotor behaviors between the two species to their utilization of different forest levels. C. brunneus tends to reside in the understory and brush layer forest levels. These more discontinuous strata necessitate higher frequencies of short-distance leaping. C. torquatus occupies the more continuous, interconnected canopy level, and much of its food is found in this level. Comparisons with other species show that Callicebus spp. locomote along smaller-sized, horizontal branches using quadrupedal progression and leaping.

© 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: July 18, 2005
Accepted: November 05, 2005
Published online: April 10, 2006
Issue release date: April 2006

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 5

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR


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