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Clinical and Laboratory Investigations

The Prevalence of Diagnosed Cutaneous Manifestations during Ambulatory Diabetes Visits in the United States, 1998–2002

Wang Y.R.a, b · Margolis D.b, c, d

Author affiliations

aPublic Policy Department, Astra Zeneca Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, Del., bLeonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, cDepartment of Dermatology, School of Medicine, and dDepartment of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., USA

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Dermatology 2006;212:229–234

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Clinical and Laboratory Investigations

Received: August 11, 2005
Accepted: November 13, 2005
Published online: April 06, 2006
Issue release date: March 2006

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1018-8665 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9832 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DRM

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of diabetes has been rapidly increasing. Previous reports indicated that diabetics are prone to certain cutaneous diseases. Objective: To determine the frequencies of diagnosed skin conditions during ambulatory diabetes visits in the USA. Methods: We evaluated two national ambulatory medical care surveys between 1998 and 2002 and compared the diagnoses of 7 categories of skin conditions in diabetics (n = 9,626) to patients with hypertension (n = 15,997) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD; n = 2,362) using χ2 tests and multivariate logistic regressions. Results: Diabetics were prone to chronic skin ulcers (odds ratio = 62.5, 95% confidence interval = 3.95–989 compared to GERD; 9.97, 6.34–15.7 compared to hypertension), bacterial skin infections (5.95, 2.86–12.4 compared to GERD; 5.15, 3.74–7.08 compared to hypertension) and fungal skin infections (2.66, 1.15–6.16 compared to GERD; 1.99, 1.32–3.01 compared to hypertension) but not to other skin conditions. These findings remained true during primary care physician visits. Conclusion: Chronic skin ulcers, bacterial and fungal skin infections are more frequently diagnosed in diabetics. We could not verify that other skin conditions are associated with diabetes, in part due to potential underdiagnosis and underreporting.

© 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel


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    External Resources

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Clinical and Laboratory Investigations

Received: August 11, 2005
Accepted: November 13, 2005
Published online: April 06, 2006
Issue release date: March 2006

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1018-8665 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9832 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DRM


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