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Review

Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Cells: Physiological and Therapeutical Approaches and Molecular Mechanisms of Interaction

A Review
Funk R.H.W. · Monsees T.K.

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Department of Anatomy, University of Technology, Dresden, Germany

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Cells Tissues Organs 2006;182:59–78

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review

Received: January 26, 2006
Published online: June 26, 2006
Issue release date: June 2006

Number of Print Pages: 20
Number of Figures: 9
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1422-6405 (Print)
eISSN: 1422-6421 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CTO

Abstract

This review concentrates on findings described in the recent literature on the response of cells and tissues to electromagnetic fields (EMF). Models of the causal interaction between different forms of EMF and ions or biomolecules of the cell will be presented together with our own results in cell surface recognition. Naturally occurring electric fields are not only important for cell-surface interactions but are also pivotal for the normal development of the organism and its physiological functions. A further goal of this review is to bridge the gap between recent cell biological studies (which, indeed, show new data of EMF actions) and aspects of EMF-based therapy, e.g., in wounds and bone fractures.

© 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

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Abstract of Review

Received: January 26, 2006
Published online: June 26, 2006
Issue release date: June 2006

Number of Print Pages: 20
Number of Figures: 9
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1422-6405 (Print)
eISSN: 1422-6421 (Online)

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