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Original Research Article

Investigating the Enhancing Effect of Music on Autobiographical Memory in Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

Irish M.a, b · Cunningham C.J.a · Walsh J.B.a · Coakley D.a · Lawlor B.A.a · Robertson I.H.b · Coen R.F.a

Author affiliations

aMercer’s Institute for Research on Ageing, St. James’s Hospital, Dublin, and bTrinity College Institute for Neuroscience and Department of Psychology, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

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Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 2006;22:108–120

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Received: January 18, 2006
Published online: June 19, 2006
Issue release date: June 2006

Number of Print Pages: 13
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM

Abstract

The enhancing effect of music on autobiographical memory recall in mild Alzheimer’s disease individuals (n = 10; Mini-Mental State Examination score >17/30) and healthy elderly matched individuals (n = 10; Mini-Mental State Examination score 25–30) was investigated. Using a repeated-measures design, each participant was seen on two occasions: once in music condition (Vivaldi’s ‘Spring’ movement from ‘The Four Seasons’) and once in silence condition, with order counterbalanced. Considerable improvement was found for Alzheimer individuals’ recall on the Autobiographical Memory Interview in the music condition, with an interaction for condition by group (p < 0.005). There were no differences in terms of overall arousal using galvanic skin response recordings or attentional errors during the Sustained Attention to Response Task. A significant reduction in state anxiety was found on the State Trait Anxiety Inventory in the music condition (p < 0.001), suggesting anxiety reduction as a potential mechanism underlying the enhancing effect of music on autobiographical memory recall.

© 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Received: January 18, 2006
Published online: June 19, 2006
Issue release date: June 2006

Number of Print Pages: 13
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/DEM


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