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Tracing the Evolution and Function of the Trk Superfamily of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

Sossin W.S.

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Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

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Brain Behav Evol 2006;68:145–156

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Received: April 12, 2006
Accepted: April 18, 2006
Published online: August 16, 2006
Issue release date: August 2006

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0006-8977 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9743 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/BBE

Abstract

Most growth factors and their receptors have been strongly conserved during evolution. In contrast, Trks (Tropomyosin-related kinases) and related receptors in the Trk superfamily, Rors (receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptors), Musks (muscle specific kinases) and Ddrs (discoidin domain receptor family), appear to be ancient, but their function has been lost in multiple lineages and the roles for the receptors have been modified over time. We will trace the evolution of the Trk superfamily and discuss possible conserved functional roles, including a unifying theme of target recognition by growing axons. We present an analogy between the evolution of G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), proposing that an important driving force for the divergence of receptors is the ease of divergence of their ligands.

© 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Received: April 12, 2006
Accepted: April 18, 2006
Published online: August 16, 2006
Issue release date: August 2006

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0006-8977 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9743 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/BBE


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